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Post December 21 2009, 9:57 AM
Iaineatan
New Arrival
 
Posts: 5
I'm trying to find my name in all the languages of my various ethnicities, but I'm having trouble finding the Irish translation of 'Miller', if one even exists. I've already got Iaineatan.

 
Post December 21 2009, 10:07 AM
scoobytyson
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 6550
Well I know someone who translates it as Ó Muilleoir. I haven't seen Iaineatan before and have no idea how it could relate to your surname.
The money-grabbing wankers who control this site can ban me too. Talk about recruiting trolls! I've spent enough time putting money in their pockets.

Post December 21 2009, 10:10 AM
scoobytyson
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Posts: 6550
Ok, I've found Iaineatan. It appears to be the Scottish Gaelic translation of Jonathan.
The money-grabbing wankers who control this site can ban me too. Talk about recruiting trolls! I've spent enough time putting money in their pockets.

Post December 21 2009, 10:15 AM
Iaineatan
New Arrival
 
Posts: 5
Thanks. Sorry I wasn't very clear about my first name. I'll stick with that, unless you know of a Gaeilge form of 'Gift of God'.

Also, I take it Ó Muilleoir is a way of rendering the sounds and not a direct translation?

Post December 21 2009, 10:32 AM
scoobytyson
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 6550
muilleoir is the Irish language equivalent of miller (a person who operates a mill) from which the English surname no doubt derives. Ó Muilleoir is a perfectly sound translation, as far as 'translations' of English surnames go, and that's assuming that it was English to start with.

To use the Scottish version of Jonathan with an Irish version of your surname is unusual, if not plain weird! Why not use Welsh, or Dutch for that matter? If Jonathan means Gift of God at all - it probably does, but I'm sure I've seen Joan, Siobhán and others given the same meaning - it is the original version that has this meaning (is it Hebrew perhaps? I have no reference books with me). Iaineatan is just a respelling of Jonathan.

There is an Irish translation for Gift of God, but I presume that the Irish version of Jonathan would be more appropriate to accompany the Irish version of the surname. John is Seán or Eoin or Eoghan (some say the latter two names are entirely separate and not altername spellings so wait for more input from others). I can't think what Jonathan is but hang around and someone will tell you.
The money-grabbing wankers who control this site can ban me too. Talk about recruiting trolls! I've spent enough time putting money in their pockets.

Post December 21 2009, 10:49 AM
BridMhor
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 5543
scoobytyson wrote:Iaineatan is just a respelling of Jonathan.


Somebody might look it up in the Bíobla - that will give the Irish of the Hebrew version. Which will undoubtedly start with "I" and will look similar to the Scottish.

Post December 21 2009, 13:29 PM
rossai
Giostaire
 
Posts: 3805
C. Ní Mhuilleora is a female student in my class. Seanán/ Sionán is normally used for Johnathan
Ba mhaith liom lámh chúnta a thabhairt d'éinne atá ag foghlaim agus ba mhaith liom déanamh amhlaidh mé fhéin.

Post December 21 2009, 17:12 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
"Jonathan" does not mean "Gift of God." "John" does. "Jonathan" and "John" are actually not related names (both are from Hebrew, of course, but they come from different roots, and have different meanings), even though the nickname for "Jonathan" ("Jon") sounds just like "John."

If you want to go with the "Gift of God" meaning anyway, than you would use one of the Irish forms of "John" ("Eoin" or "Seán").

If someone can remind me of which book of the Bible has "Jonathan" in it (I'm thinking it's either first or second Kings), I can look up the correct Biblical form of "Jonathan."

Redwolf

Post December 21 2009, 17:15 PM
rossai
Giostaire
 
Posts: 3805
Sionán/ Seanán are used for this in modern times..don't know about the bible though.
Ba mhaith liom lámh chúnta a thabhairt d'éinne atá ag foghlaim agus ba mhaith liom déanamh amhlaidh mé fhéin.

Post December 21 2009, 17:22 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
OK...here we go. It's in 1 Samuel: Iónátán

So, the upshot is, if your name is actually "John," you want to go with one of the established Irish forms of that name. "Eoin" is the Biblical form, and "Seán" is a slightly more modern form, taken from the Norman French "Jean."

If your name is actually "Jonathan," you would either go with one of the modern "stand-in" (semi-phonetic) forms rossaí gave you, or with the Biblical form Iónátán...your choice. My guess is that, while the latter is truer to the actual Biblical name, the former is more likely to be recognized by Irish speakers.

If you've somehow ended up with the hybrid "Johnathan," you're going to have to decide if you want to be a "John" or a "Jonathan" and choose accordingly.

Redwolf


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