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phrases out of Caint na nDaoine 1917

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Post June 27 2009, 3:12 AM
sean trainor
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 258
These were in Peadar Ua Laoghaire's Caint na nDaoine, but some sound a bit strange. Are these still used?

1. Have you any news? Wisha, not a bit.
Bfhuil aon sgéal nua agat? Mhuise, deamhan focal.

2. It's a long time since you paid us a visit.
Is fada dhuit anois gan teacht ghár bhféachaint. [Is féachaint even the right word here?]

3. Tá sláinte an bhradáin aige - "croí folláin agus gob fliuch."
What does this mean? Someone who likes a drink? Is this phrase still in use?

4. Is ionúin le Dia duine bocht súgach - God likes a drinker? Is this phrase in use?

5. Abair leis go rabhas ag cur a thuairisge oraibh - tell him I was asking after him. Is this still the way to say it?

6. Táthar go maith anois, buíochas le Dia dá chionn - we are fine now thank God for it. Is this "dá chionn" still used?

7. Pet name: ainm cheana

8. How old is she: An mó bliain d'aois í?

9. She is not year 14: níl na cheithre bliana déag slán fós aici.

10. He is 17 if he is not more: tá sé seacht mbliana déag, má tá sé i dtortaoibh leis. Is this still in use? Ó Dónall's dictionary has a different meaning for "i dtortaobh le", "depending on".
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Post June 27 2009, 13:29 PM
Tiarnan2
Andúileach IGTF
 
Posts: 14816
Googling...dont know if they are everyday sayings


#3 is two seanfhochail...
Croí follain agus gob fliuch.
"A healthy heart and a wet mouth!"

sláinte an bhradáin agat
Health of the Salmon to you
(before pesticides)
:lach:
=================
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Nuair a shuíonn an coileach péacoige ar a thóin, níl ann ach turcach

Chief Buffalo Breath
===========================


Wisdom is never on the menu, you have to own the restaurant.

Post June 27 2009, 15:29 PM
DoireTrasna
Aistritheoir Cíocrach
 
Posts: 15335
some would be still OK in Donegal, with minor modification
sean trainor wrote:These were in Peadar Ua Laoghaire's Caint na nDaoine, but some sound a bit strange. Are these still used?

1. Have you any news? Wisha, not a bit.
Bfhuil aon scéal nua agat? [s]Mhuise[/s] go deimhin, [s]eamhan[ss] diabhal focal.

2. It's a long time since you paid us a visit.
Is fada dhuit anois gan teacht ghár bhféachaint. [Is féachaint even the right word here?]
to say you went to visit someone in hospital (or sick at home) we'd use le hamharc (ar) so I don't see anything wrong with féachaint

3. Tá sláinte an bhradáin aige - "croí folláin agus gob fliuch."
What does this mean? Someone who likes a drink? Is this phrase still in use?
first part is at least

5. Abair leis go rabhas ag cur a thuairisge oraibh - tell him I was asking after him. Is this still the way to say it?
This is mostly fine. I question the oraibh - what purpose is it serving / what does it translate ?

9. She is not year 14: níl na cheithre bliana déag slán fós aici.
yep except for the aspiration on 4

Post June 27 2009, 15:47 PM
BridMhor
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 5543
DoireTrasna wrote:
sean trainor wrote:Tá sláinte an bhradáin aige - "croí folláin agus gob fliuch."
What does this mean? Someone who likes a drink? Is this phrase still in use?
first part is at least

:lach:


There are in Munster regional Irish. So maybe they still say it this way in Cork.

'Bhfuil aon scéal 'ad? Muise [níl], diabhal scéal. -in Connamara

Post June 27 2009, 16:29 PM
sean trainor
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 258
Thank you. The phrases seem really colloquial. Peadar Ua Laoghaire who edited the book described them as "the real, genuine stuff", but I just wasn't sure if they were still around.
Download audio files from the Gaeltacht from www.corkirish.com/audio/
Support the survival of European nations and cultures: www.vdare.com

Post July 03 2009, 1:31 AM
fiairefeadha
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 6121
BridMhor wrote:
DoireTrasna wrote:
sean trainor wrote:Tá sláinte an bhradáin aige - "croí folláin agus gob fliuch."
What does this mean? Someone who likes a drink? Is this phrase still in use?
first part is at least

:lach:


There are in Munster regional Irish. So maybe they still say it this way in Cork.

'Bhfuil aon scéal 'ad? Muise [níl], diabhal scéal. -in Connamara

Deamhain scéil in Conamara too

Post July 03 2009, 1:41 AM
sineadw
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 488
no. 5 ag cur do thuairisc...
in your sentence it means 'tell him I was asking for ye'

heard it on Ros na Run..

Fair play dhuit Seant!

no. 8 An mó bliain d'aois í? I've never heard it phrased that way! Is this munster irish?
Last edited by sineadw on July 03 2009, 1:47 AM, edited 2 times in total.

Post July 03 2009, 1:43 AM
fiairefeadha
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 6121
Yep

Post July 03 2009, 12:10 PM
DoireTrasna
Aistritheoir Cíocrach
 
Posts: 15335
I still haven't heard what purpose the "oraibh" is serving in #5

Post July 03 2009, 16:03 PM
sineadw
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 488
Maybe it means 'tell him I was asking for ye' (a little odd but possible).
In that case then I'd say it's just a way of moving around the phrase a bit, from bhur thuairsc, to a thuairisc oraibh. (then again, why not 'agaibh' in áit 'oraibh'.

Maybe that's it, i'm just thinking out loud :)

What ye reckon yerselves?



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