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HOW DO YOU SAY DOG IN IRELAND??????????????!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Post September 22 2002, 1:04 AM
lesliecake
New Arrival
 
Posts: 1
HOW DO YOU SAY DOG IN IRELAND!!!??? :oops: :cry: :lol: 8) :? 8O :D :) :( :o :idea: :wink: :roll: :twisted: :x :P :oops: :cry: :| :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

 
Post September 22 2002, 13:11 PM
Nainsi
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 237
Dog = madra

Post September 23 2002, 8:57 AM
irishgaelictranslator
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3010
say it:
mod-ra
Image

Post January 23 2003, 16:22 PM
an táin
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 264
no its not mod-ra its madra!!
learn foghraiocht

Post January 23 2003, 18:48 PM
Tadhg an Mhargaidh
Scéalaí Mór
 
Posts: 2701
A chairde,

In Ulster Irish it's pronounced as 'mahdoo' and in Connemara Irish it's pronounced as 'maahda' (the vowel is longer)

(the 'r' isn't pronounced at all and the 'd' in both pronunciations is dental)

le meas,


Tadhg

Post January 23 2003, 18:51 PM
Nainsi
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 237
an táin,

As the majority of people who ask for translations and/or pronunciations on the forum probably do not know foghraíocht (phonetics), I feel that Eoin's system of spelling out pronunciations in the manner that the typical English speaker would say those English-pronounced letter combinations is a more effective method in this venue.

Nainsí
Last edited by Nainsi on January 24 2003, 13:15 PM, edited 1 time in total.

Post January 23 2003, 19:10 PM
Brian Costello
Laoch na nGael
 
Posts: 656
Dear lesliecake,

There are several ways to say "dog" in Irish depending on area and dialect. I probably don't know all of them. One already mentioned by
previous contributors is MADRA . This is used in southern Ireland and
is the standard Irish Gaelic. Another, used widely in the north is
MADADH (pronounced mah-doo) and also used in Scotland where it
is pronounced mah-dugg). Both of these words are related to Welsh
madog meaning "fox". Another word used in northern Ireland
is CULAí (koo-lee) as in culaí dubh (koo-lee du:) "black dog". As
you might suspect, our English word collie comes from this word. Older
Irish always used Cú for "dog", a word related to Gaulish cuno,
Greek cyon and German Hund. But in modern Irish cú means
"hound" and is seldom used.

Post January 23 2003, 19:11 PM
Brian Costello
Laoch na nGael
 
Posts: 656
Dear lesliecake,

There are several ways to say "dog" in Irish depending on area and dialect. I probably don't know all of them. One already mentioned by
previous contributors is MADRA . This is used in southern Ireland and
is the standard Irish Gaelic. Another, used widely in the north is
MADADH (pronounced mah-doo) and also used in Scotland where it
is pronounced mah-dugg). Both of these words are related to Welsh
madog meaning "fox". Another word used in northern Ireland
is CULAí (koo-lee) as in culaí dubh (koo-lee du:) "black dog". As
you might suspect, our English word collie comes from this word. Older
Irish always used Cú for "dog", a word related to Gaulish cuno,
Greek cyon and German Hund. But in modern Irish cú means
"hound" and is seldom used.

Post January 23 2003, 21:48 PM
Tadhg an Mhargaidh
Scéalaí Mór
 
Posts: 2701
Brian,

Another word for 'dog' which is used in Connemara is 'gadhar'
( GUY-er).

Nainsí, the phonetic spellings I offered (mah-doo, etc.)
were also meant to be read as if they were words in English.

Brian, I'd never heard 'culaí' (as coo-lee) before but I have heard Donegal people say 'coilí' (pron. COLLie or CULLie) as a generic name for a dog when they call, say, a stray dog - as in 'here, doggy/puppy', etc. I would surmise that it's a derivative of the word for 'puppy' in Irish, i.e. 'coileán'

You're right, the historical spelling for the used in Connacht and Ulster is 'madadh'

le meas,

Tadhg

Post January 24 2003, 0:55 AM
Nainsi
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 237
Tadhg,

My comment was with reference to an táin's post (which appears above yours) not yours. My post appears after yours on the forum, but I had not seen yours when I made mine, as we were apparently posting at almost exactly the same time and yours was not yet visable to me then. Sorry for any misunderstanding with reference to your post.

Nainsí


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