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Wolf?

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Post May 22 2008, 6:06 AM
Maewolf
New Arrival
 
Posts: 5
Alright so i all i can find for wolf is Mac tíre
However someone had said that there is a female version to it...starts like with an I.

I dont remember exactly what the word was..but is there a feminine version of it?

 
Post May 22 2008, 9:24 AM
Brian O'Cathain
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 474
Wolf - sionnach or faoil (Shun-ach or Fweel)
Wolfhound - Cú (Coo)
Vixen - Báirseach (Boyer-shoch)

Those "chs" are pronounced as in Scottich "Loch"

Post May 22 2008, 10:23 AM
Antóin
Giostaire
 
Posts: 4290
Wolf = Mac tíre (whether male or female)

Maybe someone got confused by the 'mac' part which literally means 'son'. 'Iníon' means daughter but is not used as the female equivalent of 'mac tíre'.

"Faolchú" is another Irish name for 'wolf'.

"Faol" is only used as a prefix nowadays AFAIK.

Brian:
Sionnach is a fox - not a wolf.

'faoil' is the genitive of 'faol'.

Post May 22 2008, 10:24 AM
Caffler
Aistritheoir Cíocrach
 
Posts: 15733
faolchú baineann
is the normal phrase used in zoological circles for she-wolf (literaly: female wolf)

another word for wolf is mac tíre it means literally a country son
so probably the person told you that

iníon tíre

was the phrase for she wolf
iníon being the word for daughter.
but although i quite like the idea myself, i don't think this phrase is used.
could be wrong though so wait on other input.
Get the Ræliksen CD here
éist leis an gceol

tá sult na saoirse i gcló na gcrann
is grá don tsúil a fiaradh,
tá dúil sa rud tá casta cam
is gráin don bhog is don díreach.

Post May 22 2008, 10:26 AM
Caffler
Aistritheoir Cíocrach
 
Posts: 15733
was still writing when you posted A :D
Get the Ræliksen CD here
éist leis an gceol

tá sult na saoirse i gcló na gcrann
is grá don tsúil a fiaradh,
tá dúil sa rud tá casta cam
is gráin don bhog is don díreach.

Post May 22 2008, 11:02 AM
SeanMurphy1
Giostaire
 
Posts: 3387
and heres me thing my ex was faolchú baineann she used to howl at night or was that snorning well any way just another word for she wolf
Ritheann fear buile trí thuile go dána, ach is minic thug tuile fear buile le fána

Post May 22 2008, 21:51 PM
Maewolf
New Arrival
 
Posts: 5
Hmm lol Thats alot XD

Anyways i have a wolf pawprint tattoo and wanted to add the word wolf in irish gaelic to it so people didnt call it a jaguar paw print anymore XP lol but the one i found just looks like Mac tire XD alright...thanks guys lol

Post May 27 2008, 22:24 PM
Maewolf
New Arrival
 
Posts: 5
I found these online...do they work?

faoilleach
the month extending from the middle of January to the middle of February, Irish faoillidh (do.), faoilleach (do.), holidays, Carnival. The idea is "Carnival" or month of rejoicing; from faoilidh. Usually referred to faol, wolf: "wolf-month". Cf. féill. February in Irish = mí na Féile Bríghde.


++faol
a wolf, so Irish, Early Irish fáel, fael-chú, Welsh gweilgi, the sea ("wild dog"), *vailo-s; Armenian gail.


Gearran
the 4 weeks dating from 15th March onwards (H.S.D.). This forms a part of the animal nomenclature given to the several periods of Spring-time: first the , explained as "Wolf-month"; then the , or Plover, a week's length; then the , or Gelding, variously estimated as to length and time; then came the , or Old Woman, a week's time; then perhaps the three days of the , or ewes. See Nich. pp 412-414.


saigh
a bitch, Irish saith ( Con., Lane, etc.), sagh, saighín (O'Br.), Middle Irish sogh, sodh, Early Irish sod, bitch, she-wolf:


ulbh
you brute! (Sutherland); from Norse úlfr, wolf.

Post May 28 2008, 1:13 AM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
Maewolf wrote:I found these online...do they work?

faoilleach
the month extending from the middle of January to the middle of February, Irish faoillidh (do.), faoilleach (do.), holidays, Carnival. The idea is "Carnival" or month of rejoicing; from faoilidh. Usually referred to faol, wolf: "wolf-month". Cf. féill. February in Irish = mí na Féile Bríghde.


++faol
a wolf, so Irish, Early Irish fáel, fael-chú, Welsh gweilgi, the sea ("wild dog"), *vailo-s; Armenian gail.


Gearran
the 4 weeks dating from 15th March onwards (H.S.D.). This forms a part of the animal nomenclature given to the several periods of Spring-time: first the , explained as "Wolf-month"; then the , or Plover, a week's length; then the , or Gelding, variously estimated as to length and time; then came the , or Old Woman, a week's time; then perhaps the three days of the , or ewes. See Nich. pp 412-414.


saigh
a bitch, Irish saith ( Con., Lane, etc.), sagh, saighín (O'Br.), Middle Irish sogh, sodh, Early Irish sod, bitch, she-wolf:


ulbh
you brute! (Sutherland); from Norse úlfr, wolf.


No.

You want Mac Tíre or Faolchú, as has already been stated. If you specifically want to say "female wolf," you want faolchú baineann, again, as has already been stated. You've got languages up there that aren't even related to Irish!

FWIW, "féile" means "feast/festival" and has nothing to do with wolves...no matter what the neo-pagans may want to think! There's also a "Féile Pádraig" in March and a "Féile Eoin" in June.

There is nothing inherently masculine about either "Mac Tíre" or "Faolchú"

Redwolf
Last edited by Redwolf on May 28 2008, 2:23 AM, edited 1 time in total.

Post May 28 2008, 1:34 AM
Dun Chaochain
Laoch na nGael
 
Posts: 506
Redwolf wrote:
Maewolf wrote:I found these online...do they work?

faoilleach
the month extending from the middle of January to the middle of February, Irish faoillidh (do.), faoilleach (do.), holidays, Carnival. The idea is "Carnival" or month of rejoicing; from faoilidh. Usually referred to faol, wolf: "wolf-month". Cf. féill. February in Irish = mí na Féile Bríghde.


++faol
a wolf, so Irish, Early Irish fáel, fael-chú, Welsh gweilgi, the sea ("wild dog"), *vailo-s; Armenian gail.


Gearran
the 4 weeks dating from 15th March onwards (H.S.D.). This forms a part of the animal nomenclature given to the several periods of Spring-time: first the , explained as "Wolf-month"; then the , or Plover, a week's length; then the , or Gelding, variously estimated as to length and time; then came the , or Old Woman, a week's time; then perhaps the three days of the , or ewes. See Nich. pp 412-414.


saigh
a bitch, Irish saith ( Con., Lane, etc.), sagh, saighín (O'Br.), Middle Irish sogh, sodh, Early Irish sod, bitch, she-wolf:


ulbh
you brute! (Sutherland); from Norse úlfr, wolf.


No.

You want Mac Tíre or Faolchú, as has already been stated. If you specifically want to say "female wolf," you want faolchú baineann, again, as has already been stated. You've got languages up there that aren't even related to Irish!

There is nothing inherently masculine about either "Mac Tíre" or "Faolchú"

Redwolf


Listen to Redwolf.


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