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Daughter of the sea

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Post March 14 2007, 8:55 AM
daneycelt
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 109
Hey. Anyone know how I would say "Daughter of...." somthing I.E

Daughter of the sea, how would that be said, thank you.
"It's a dangerous business going out your door, you step into the road and if you don't keep your feet, there is no knowing where you might be swept off to." - Bilbo Baggins

 
Post March 14 2007, 9:04 AM
Caffler
Aistritheoir Cíocrach
 
Posts: 15733
iníon na mara - daughter of the sea
iníon - daughter
na mara - of the sea

just saying daughter of....
could be iníon de....

but it depends on the whole phrase
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Post March 14 2007, 9:05 AM
Christy Quinn.
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 6024
daneycelt wrote:Hey. Anyone know how I would say "Daughter of...." somthing I.E

Daughter of the sea, how would that be said, thank you.


Hi, try

''Iníon na mara'' Wait for more to be sure,Christy :ja: Is cinnte gur raibh tighpo agam le ''m'' annsin :lach:
Last edited by Christy Quinn. on March 14 2007, 17:34 PM, edited 1 time in total.
Wait for more to be sure.
Quae Sursum volo videre.
The Mouth from the South.
An sean duine liath.

Post March 14 2007, 9:09 AM
daneycelt
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 109
does that mean Mac na mara mean son of the sea?
"It's a dangerous business going out your door, you step into the road and if you don't keep your feet, there is no knowing where you might be swept off to." - Bilbo Baggins

Post March 14 2007, 9:29 AM
Asarlaí
 
daneycelt wrote:does that mean Mac na mara mean son of the sea?
Yes it does..

Post March 14 2007, 14:03 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
Bottom line, the "of the" designation comes from the following word...it has to be in the genitive case. In your example, "mara" is the genitive singular of "muir" and 'na' is the definite article, so the phrase "na mara" means "of the sea."

Muir = sea

Mara = of sea

Na = the

Iníon = daughter

Iníon na mara = daughter of the sea

Whenever you want to express this kind of relationship, you need to find out what the genitive of the word is and if it's masculine or feminine (if it's masculine, the definite article turns from "na" to "an")

Just for future reference. :wink:

Redwolf

Post October 12 2008, 23:58 PM
daneycelt
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 109
so could it also be

Nee na mara?
"It's a dangerous business going out your door, you step into the road and if you don't keep your feet, there is no knowing where you might be swept off to." - Bilbo Baggins

Post October 13 2008, 0:00 AM
DoireTrasna
Aistritheoir Cíocrach
 
Posts: 15335
daneycelt wrote:so could it also be

Nee na mara?

no there is no word "nee"

Post October 13 2008, 0:50 AM
fiairefeadha
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 6120
daneycelt wrote:does that mean Mac na mara mean son of the sea?
Mac na mara means son of the sea but the surname mcnamara comes from mac conmara which means son of the sea hound or seawolf.[/b] Another possibility for daughter of the sea is "Iníon na farraige"



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