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My soul mate

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Post December 23 2006, 19:42 PM
robertsgirl728
New Arrival
 
Posts: 1
I need the translation for my soul mate. I think it is mo anam cara but I don't know where the fadas go. Please help me. Thanks

 
Post December 23 2006, 19:45 PM
Asarlaí
 
robertsgirl728 wrote:I need the translation for my soul mate. I think it is mo anam cara but I don't know where the fadas go. Please help me. Thanks


No fadas needed. It should be one word though - Anamchara
M'anamchara - My soulmate


Post December 23 2006, 19:50 PM
Brian
Andúileach IGTF
 
Posts: 14819
The consensus is that the word Anamchara has a spiritual rather than a romantic connotation (Spiritual advisor/ soul minder).


The preferred word for soulmate in the 'loving' sense is
Sonuachar


My soulmate
Mo Shonuachar
It's a job that's never started that takes the longest to finish.

Post December 23 2006, 19:56 PM
Asarlaí
 
Sonuachar means true spouse and is only any good if you are to marry the person you are referring to.

Anamchara traditionally means spiritual advisor but in modern usage 'soul mate' is a closer definition.




Post December 23 2006, 19:57 PM
Brian
Andúileach IGTF
 
Posts: 14819
Asarlaí wrote:Sonuachar means true spouse and is only any good if you are to marry the person you are referring to.

Anamchara traditionally means spiritual advisor but in modern usage 'soul mate' is a closer definition.






Your contentions are open to debate!
It's a job that's never started that takes the longest to finish.

Post December 23 2006, 19:59 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
What we've come down to is that Americans and Europeans typically mean different things when they say "soul mate." Americans almost always mean something along the lines of "fated/intended lover," with romantic overtones, and "anamchara" really doesn't resonate for that.

Redwolf

Post December 23 2006, 20:01 PM
Brian
Andúileach IGTF
 
Posts: 14819
From 2 years ago



"Soulmate"


We get asked about this one so often, I thought it a good idea to copy here the excellent post on this subject made by Tadgh an Mhargaidh a while back (since it's the one we all tend to refer to anyway). Here goes:


Quote:
It seems to be a commom misconception that the Irish word ‘anamchara’ (literally ‘soulfriend’) means ‘soulmate’ (in the modern English sense of ‘true love’, ‘perfect mate’, etc.)

‘Anamchara’ traditionally means ‘spiritual advisor’/'confessor'/'spiritual mentor', etc.. I believe it has its origin in medieval times when (younger) monks sought advice from older more spiritually mature monks.

It was never used to mean ‘soulmate’ in the modern English sense.

I was thinking about this question yesterday and how one would properly translate the modern English meaning of ‘soulmate’ into Irish. I’ve come to the conclusion that there is no exact equivalent (there rarely is) but that there is a word/concept in Irish which is similar enough in meaning to be used as the Gaelic equivalent of ‘soulmate’ :

Sonuachar

As in the blessing :

Sonuachar chugat !

which I would translate roughly as

May you find a soulmate !

‘Sonuachar’ roughly means a ‘good spouse’ (‘sona’ = happy ; sonuachar = 'someone you’re happily married to’) and would be an appropriate word to use to translate expressions like

To my soulmate = Do mo shonuachar

You’re my soulmate = Is tú mo shonuachar

And so on.

Spread the word !
It's a job that's never started that takes the longest to finish.

Post December 23 2006, 20:02 PM
Asarlaí
 
Maybe, no where in any dictionary does it say that Sonuachar means soul mate - Anamchara at least has one dictionary on its side. I see no reason for learners to argue with the dictionary - That's my side :wink:

Post December 23 2006, 20:49 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
Asarlaí wrote:Maybe, no where in any dictionary does it say that Sonuachar means soul mate - Anamchara at least has one dictionary on its side. I see no reason for learners to argue with the dictionary - That's my side :wink:


Which dictionary is that?

I'm just not seeing where "anamchara" ever has the meaning of "fated/intended lover." "Close friend" I could buy (and it seems that is the European meaning of "soul mate")...but that's not what most people HERE mean when they say "soul mate."

Wasn't it Seán a' chóta just a short while ago who was saying that the only thing he thinks of when he sees "anamchara" is "confessor"? And the person who suggested "sonuachar" was Tadhg...neither of them are people I would consider "learners."

Redwolf

Post December 23 2006, 21:11 PM
Brian
Andúileach IGTF
 
Posts: 14819
I liked this Seán A Chóta Sermon....




I often suspect that the position of the Irish language may be unique in the world. There are about 80,000 who speak it as a first language, both in the Gaeltacht and elsewhere. There is a somewhat greater number who have acquired a fluent knowledge of it as a second language. Put the two groups together and they come to maybe 200,000. On the other hand, there are well over a million who think they know enough to describe themselves as Irish speakers in the census. In fact, their knowledge of the language varies from the tolerable to the execrable, covering all points in between. In other words, the "learners" (placed in quotation marks because most of them are not engaged in any active learning but will be absorbing bits and pieces by osmosis from television, press, etc.) outnumber those who actually speak the language by more than five to one.

I can't think of any other language of which that is true. Generally, if a language attracts large numbers of learners it will also have large numbers of native speakers who will help to maintain the integrity of its grammar, pronunciation, vocabulary and idioms, and who will ensure continuity with existing usage. Conversely, if a language has a small number of speakers, not many people will bother to learn it. For example, about the same numbers speak Gaelic and Irish as first languages, but the number speaking Gaelic as a second language is tiny. So although the language is subjected to influence from English externally, it's much less open to being subverted from within than is the case with Irish.

Because of the exeptional vulnerability of Irish, it is particularly important to be alert to the danger of Béarlachas in all its forms.
It's a job that's never started that takes the longest to finish.


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