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Pronunciation of currach

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Post December 09 2006, 16:39 PM
Hearaoi
New Arrival
 
Posts: 5
I've heard several pronunciations of <i>currach</i>, the word for the lath/sealskin/tar Irish boat. Does it rhyme with <i>hurrah</i> or <i>track</i> or <i>truck</i>?
Hearaoi

 
Post December 09 2006, 16:58 PM
Brian
Andúileach IGTF
 
Posts: 14819
To me it has a softer OCH sound

As in the OCH Loch Ness
It's a job that's never started that takes the longest to finish.

Post December 09 2006, 17:16 PM
Riadach
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 5263
You almost have the three dialects there hearaoi.

In the north currach- would be curr- uh
in the west currach would be curr- uch
in the southwest it would be c'-roch but they use naomhóg instead.
Níl leigheas ar ghrá ach pósadh

Post December 09 2006, 17:18 PM
Hearaoi
New Arrival
 
Posts: 5
Pól,
Thanks. After alternating between <i>hurrah</i> and pronouncing a sort of a <i>k</i> sound, I had begun to settle on the latter. <i>loch</i> strikes me as the proper sort of <i>k</i>.
Hearaoi

Post December 09 2006, 17:24 PM
Hearaoi
New Arrival
 
Posts: 5
Riadach,

Thanks.

Gee, I don't know that I can adapt to the complications. I'll just have to take a stand - but I'm far too wishy-washy.

I see naomhóg used to describe a particular design of the boat, in fact a design used also for racing.
Hearaoi

Post December 09 2006, 17:27 PM
Riadach
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 5263
well i've never heard naomhóg being used in conamara. I thought it was area specific, and would not think there was any morphological difference with the naomhóga of the Blascaoid, and the curraigh in Conamara. The naomhóga in the blascaoid were used (and still) to ship animals seaweed and turf, as are the curraigh in conamara.
Níl leigheas ar ghrá ach pósadh

Post December 09 2006, 18:10 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
I should also add that the emphasis is on the first syllable. I mention it only because most Americans would pronounce "hurrah" as "hur-AH," and "currach" has the opposite emphasis.

Redwolf

Post December 09 2006, 19:16 PM
Hearaoi
New Arrival
 
Posts: 5
Redwolf,
Thanks. necessary information. I've always been conscious of how different <i>post office</i> sounds, completely ignoring the brogue, when said by my mother (Irish born) and Myself (American born).
Hearaoi

Post December 09 2006, 19:31 PM
Hearaoi
New Arrival
 
Posts: 5
Riadach,

Thanks again.

I can't, and don't, speak with any authority. I have collected some currach information just now thru Google. It's long, and I don't want to abuse the thread, but I'll send it on to you privately if you wish. What I found does not claim to be definitive, but it is interesting, at least to me as I try to form a currach racing club in Chicago. I'm 80, so I won't be pulling oars myself.

With my less than meagre Irish, I translate naomhóg to mean <i>young saint</i>. Correct?
Hearaoi

Post December 09 2006, 19:33 PM
Riadach
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 5263
I'm really not sure where it comes from. It looks like it should be young saint doesn't it? I would maybe think it has something to do with nae- a rare word for boat.
Níl leigheas ar ghrá ach pósadh



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