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Post July 08 2006, 19:48 PM
laurence townsend
New Arrival
 
Posts: 1
Can anyone confirm th correct spelling of Eithna with accents (if any).

I believe in English this translates as "Edna".

Is there an Irish Gaelic translation of "Laurence" (Latin root for 'victor') and how does one translate: "Welcome to your new home!" in Irish Gaelic.

Thanks!

 
Post July 08 2006, 19:56 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
laurence townsend wrote:Can anyone confirm th correct spelling of Eithna with accents (if any).

I believe in English this translates as "Edna".

Is there an Irish Gaelic translation of "Laurence" (Latin root for 'victor') and how does one translate: "Welcome to your new home!" in Irish Gaelic.

Thanks!


I think you may be thinking of "Eithne," which usually gets rendered in English as "Enya."

"Edna" doesn't have an Irish form. Most non-Irish names don't, actually. Just some Biblical and saints names, for the most part.

The Irish form of "Laurance" is "Labhrás."

Fáilte go do bhaile nua: Welcome to your new home (if speaking to one person)

Fáilte go bhur mbhaile nua: Welcome to your new home (if speaking to multiple people)

Redwolf

Post July 08 2006, 20:00 PM
Somhairle
Laoch na nGael
 
Posts: 1442
Do you mean Eithne? It is pronounced like Enya

A form of Laurance might be Labhrás, pronounced LAOW-rass

I've found another name for Victor, which is Buach, pronounced BOO-ock (gutteral ock, like Loch.

Welcome to your new home
Fáilte roimh do teach nua.
Fáilte go dtí do teach nua.


Wait for corrections.

Post July 08 2006, 20:04 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
Somhairle wrote:Do you mean Eithne? It is pronounced like Enya

A form of Laurance might be Labhrás, pronounced LAOW-rass

I've found another name for Victor, which is Buach, pronounced BOO-ock (gutteral ock, like Loch.

Welcome to your new home
Fáilte roimh do teach nua.
Fáilte go dtí do teach nua.


Wait for corrections.


I thought one only used "go dtí" with the definite article (?)

Redwolf

Post July 08 2006, 20:06 PM
Somhairle
Laoch na nGael
 
Posts: 1442
I don't know. It just sounded right because I was being used with "do", or in the plural sence "bhur".

Hmm...thinking about it again...

Fáilte go bhur dteach nua
Fáilte go bhur mbaile nua

Urgh, I don't know anymore! :lach:

Post July 08 2006, 20:09 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
Somhairle wrote:I don't know. It just sounded right because I was being used with "do", or in the plural sence "bhur".

Hmm...thinking about it again...

Fáilte go bhur dteach nua
Fáilte go bhur mbaile nua

Urgh, I don't know anymore! :lach:


You and me both! :lach:

We should clarify, for the original poster, that "teach" and "baile" are probably both valid. "Teach" means "house" and "baile" means "home." Since "baile" can also mean "town," sometimes "teach" is a better choice, especially if there's likely to be some confusion as to which is meant.

Redwolf

Post July 08 2006, 20:14 PM
Tiarnan2
Andúileach IGTF
 
Posts: 14816
Lorcán is also translated as Lawrence As in St Lawrence oToole Archbishop of Dublin.
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Post July 09 2006, 10:48 AM
Breda206
Anseo again
 
Posts: 13
'Eithne' translates into English as 'Eithne', 'Ethna' or 'Annie'.
'Laurence' translates into Irish as 'Labhrás'.
'Victor' translates into Irish as 'Buach' but this name has a genitive form, so if you were calling Victor you would say 'A Bhuaigh'.

These are all in 'An Sloinnteoir Gaeilge agus an tAinmneoir' written by Muiris Ó Droighneáin and published by Coiscéim.

I would translate 'Welcome to your new home' as 'Fáilte go do theach nua' (singular) or 'Fáilte go bhur dteach nua' (plural).


Hope this helps :D
Cainteoir dúchais le B.A. i nGaeilge agus M.A. i Staidéar an Aistriúcháin.
Is í an Ghaeilge mo ghrá!

Post July 16 2006, 11:29 AM
SeanMurphy1
Giostaire
 
Posts: 3387
Eithne - (AY-he-ne or ETH-nuh) Ethna, Etney.
Ritheann fear buile trí thuile go dána, ach is minic thug tuile fear buile le fána



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