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Irish Surnames and Gaelic Grammar

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Post April 22 2006, 11:46 AM
Stiofan951
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 220
oisin718 wrote:"Ruarc" is the original given name.

According to your research, the first person to take the family name "Ó Ruairc" did so because he was Ruarc's grandson. "Ó" meant "grandon."

The addition of the "i" marks the palatization of the final consonant cluster, a remnant of an ancient case ending in -i that is now lost. This is how the genitive case is formed in the majority of masculine nouns, male given names included in them.

"


Oisin, can you elaborate on the sentence where you say "The addition of the "i" marks the palatization of the final consonant cluster, a remnant of an ancient case ending in -i that is now lost."
"The problems that exist in the world today cannot be solved by the level of thinking that created them."

-- Albert Einstein

 
Post April 22 2006, 13:31 PM
Stiofan951
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 220
thanks
Last edited by Stiofan951 on May 30 2007, 10:11 AM, edited 1 time in total.

Post April 22 2006, 18:27 PM
wdsci
Aistritheoir Cíocrach
 
Posts: 19066
Not really . . . you've got something about "friend from us" (cara dúinn) in there.

:) David
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Post April 22 2006, 20:49 PM
Stiofan951
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 220
:D
Last edited by Stiofan951 on May 30 2007, 10:11 AM, edited 1 time in total.
"The problems that exist in the world today cannot be solved by the level of thinking that created them."

-- Albert Einstein

Post April 25 2006, 0:27 AM
Stiofan951
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 220
Last edited by Stiofan951 on May 30 2007, 10:13 AM, edited 1 time in total.
"The problems that exist in the world today cannot be solved by the level of thinking that created them."

-- Albert Einstein

Post April 25 2006, 0:40 AM
oisin718
Andúileach IGTF
 
Posts: 14098
Stiofan951 wrote:
Oisin, can you elaborate on the sentence where you say "The addition of the "i" marks the palatization of the final consonant cluster, a remnant of an ancient case ending in -i that is now lost."


Consonants in Irish are either broad or slender. Consonants are broad if they are articulated together with back vowels (a, o, u) and slender if they are articulated with front vowels (i, e).

At an early stage in its history, the ancestor of Irish fixed word-stress on the primary root syllable, which meant that over time case endings -- like you find in Latin and Russian -- became indistinct and were eventually lost. But the effect that these endings had on the rest of the word remained.

The genitive of the masculine singular must have ended in -i, kind of like in Latin. Even though the ending was lost, its presence was still felt in the fact that the final consonant in the genitive singular became slender.

Post April 25 2006, 3:16 AM
Aibigéal
Scríbhneoir d'Éigean
 
Posts: 20550
Interesting stuff, Oisín! :ja:


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