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Irish Surnames and Gaelic Grammar

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Post April 21 2006, 15:17 PM
oisin718
Andúileach IGTF
 
Posts: 14098
sean mhic cuarta wrote:What I would like to know however, is what ben means in Irish.. (ben Tighernan Uí Ruarc) I have never seen this before, but it brings to mind something similar in the Jewish tradition, where it seems to have been used as mac as used in Ireland. Does anyone have any idea? :nixweiss:


"Ben" is an old spelling of "Bean."

Woman, and by extention wife:

Bean Uí Cearúil --> Mrs. O'Carroll etc.

 
Post April 21 2006, 15:19 PM
sean mhic cuarta
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 206
I just figured that out. Thanks Oisin! Derforgall, woman of Tiernan, of clan O'Rourke then would be the literal translation?

Post April 21 2006, 15:22 PM
An Mathghamhain
Scéalaí Mór
 
Posts: 1594
Stiofan951 wrote:
An Mathghamhain wrote:I think Hillary is Éalár.

Cairistìona, this name looks Scots-Gaelic to me.


Cairistìona -- Thank you, I was trying for the Irish form of Christine.

for Jillian I have Jilleen,
for Stephen I have Stiofan
for Phillip I have Pilib,
for Brendan I have Breandán,
for Roderick I have Ruaidhrí,
for Claire I have Clár,
for Adrian I have Aidrian,
for Timothy I have Tadhg,
for Kathleen I have Cáitlín,
for Geraldine I have Gearoidín,
for Patrick I have Pádraig,
and for Moira I now have Máire (thank you).


Cristín might be Christine in Irish.

I doubt that Jillian has an Irish form. Jilleen is definitely not Irish.

Caitlín has no fada/ accent over the "a".

And remember that Stiofán has a fada/ accent over the "a".
a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,i,l,m,n,o,p,r,s,t,u

Níl Gaeilge líofa agam.

I don't speak fluent Irish.

Post April 21 2006, 15:23 PM
Stiofan951
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 220
Thank you.
Last edited by Stiofan951 on April 26 2006, 6:07 AM, edited 3 times in total.
"The problems that exist in the world today cannot be solved by the level of thinking that created them."

-- Albert Einstein

Post April 21 2006, 15:31 PM
Stiofan951
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 220
Cristín might be Christine in Irish.

I doubt that Jillian has an Irish form. Jilleen is definitely not Irish.

Jillian means youthful if that helps. I know you can't just translate the word youthful, but often names keep their meaning across languages. So (perhaps) I'm looking for and Irish girls name that means youthful.
"The problems that exist in the world today cannot be solved by the level of thinking that created them."

-- Albert Einstein

Post April 21 2006, 15:41 PM
Ossian
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 389
Tá ceist agamsa freisin faoi sloinnte...

I've seen my surname (McDonald) in Gaelic several different ways, but I would like to know the appropriate Modern Irish variation.

I've seen Mac Dónaill, Mac Dhómhnaill, and the old Scottish Gaelic Mac Dhomhnuill. Which (if any) is the correct Modern Irish spelling?

Go raibh maith agaibh, a chairde.
Nothing I translate in Irish is reliable, so please wait for confirmation

Ne vous fiez à aucune de mes traductions irlandaises sans l'approbation d'un locuteur chevronné.

Post April 21 2006, 15:42 PM
oisin718
Andúileach IGTF
 
Posts: 14098
The first is the modern form:

Mac Dónaill

Post April 21 2006, 15:44 PM
An Mathghamhain
Scéalaí Mór
 
Posts: 1594
Stiofan951 wrote:Cristín might be Christine in Irish.

I doubt that Jillian has an Irish form. Jilleen is definitely not Irish.

Jillian means youthful if that helps. I know you can't just translate the word youthful, but often names keep their meaning across languages. So (perhaps) I'm looking for and Irish girls name that means youthful.


I had a quick look around the net and according to "name" sites Jillian is Old English for girl.

Cailín is the Irish word for a girl. However going from Jillian to Cailín is a big step. Personally, I'd stick with Jillian.
a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,i,l,m,n,o,p,r,s,t,u

Níl Gaeilge líofa agam.

I don't speak fluent Irish.

Post April 21 2006, 15:50 PM
An Mathghamhain
Scéalaí Mór
 
Posts: 1594
Ossian wrote:Tá ceist agamsa freisin faoi sloinnte...

I've seen my surname (McDonald) in Gaelic several different ways, but I would like to know the appropriate Modern Irish variation.

I've seen Mac Dónaill, Mac Dhómhnaill, and the old Scottish Gaelic Mac Dhomhnuill. Which (if any) is the correct Modern Irish spelling?

Go raibh maith agaibh, a chairde.


My surname is Mac Domhnaill. I'd have no truck with Mac Dónaill. :mrgreen: :ja:

There is also Mac Dhomhnaill (used in Ulster and anglicised MacConnell)

and the Scots use Mac Dhomhnuill
a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,i,l,m,n,o,p,r,s,t,u

Níl Gaeilge líofa agam.

I don't speak fluent Irish.

Post April 21 2006, 15:50 PM
Stiofan951
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 220
Thankyou
Last edited by Stiofan951 on May 30 2007, 10:10 AM, edited 1 time in total.
"The problems that exist in the world today cannot be solved by the level of thinking that created them."

-- Albert Einstein


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