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Nollaig Shona

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Post December 11 2005, 19:35 PM
Jack Sampsin
Getting Addicted
 
Posts: 55
Over here in the States people are constantly asking how to say 'Happy Christmas'. I tell them that there really is no true direct translation, but that, word for word, the answer is; 'Nollaig Shona'. However, I'm not really comfortable, making this statement, because I really don't want them to think that there is a direct translation.

Also, I have seen the following printed in a local newspaper; 'Nola Shona Dhuit' - is this right?

Slainte,

Jack

 
Post December 11 2005, 19:40 PM
Richie
Giostaire
 
Posts: 3124
Nollaig shona duit = Happy Christmas to you (one person)
Nollaig shona daoibh = Happy Christmas to you (more than one person)

Typo corrected.
Last edited by Richie on December 11 2005, 19:52 PM, edited 1 time in total.
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Post December 11 2005, 19:44 PM
loucarey
Anseo again
 
Posts: 20
Jack Sampsin wrote:

Also, I have seen the following printed in a local newspaper; 'Nola Shona Dhuit' - is this right?

Slainte,

Jack

i havent seen nola shona dhuit before but ive seen nollaig shona dhuit.
nollaig shona dhuit is how you say happy christmas while directing it at someone so literally you are sayin happy christmas to you.

im not too sure thought so wait until someone confirms this

Post December 11 2005, 19:45 PM
loucarey
Anseo again
 
Posts: 20
just saw richie's reply i think his is more correct than mine

Post December 11 2005, 19:48 PM
Asarlaí
 
Yours is right Lou.. it's Nollaig shona duit

Post December 11 2005, 19:54 PM
Jack Sampsin
Getting Addicted
 
Posts: 55
Kind of where I was coming from was that Gaelic was originally a pagan language. So where did 'Nollaig' even come from.

Although I don't dispute that it does exist, and is in popular use, with which I have no problem, I wondered where it came from?

Also, I would expect that a phrase such as 'the season's best to you' (Beanachtai an tSéasúir Duit) was more pure or true to the language and its origins.

Jack.

Post December 11 2005, 19:57 PM
Asarlaí
 
Nollaig is also the Irish word for December so the Christian element is alot more noticeable in the English than in the Irish.

Post December 11 2005, 20:02 PM
Richie
Giostaire
 
Posts: 3124
Nollaig, I believe, was the pagan festival celebrated on or around the 25th of December.
The reason the first Christians in Ireland chose to name the 25th as Christ's birthday was to make the transition of religions easier on the pagans.
It's done all the time with religions, that's how the Romans and Greeks had similar Gods, also how the Celtic cross has a circle (to keep the sun-worshipping element).
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Post December 11 2005, 22:05 PM
wdsci
Aistritheoir Cíocrach
 
Posts: 19066
Jack Sampsin wrote:Kind of where I was coming from was that Gaelic was originally a pagan language. So where did 'Nollaig' even come from.

Although I don't dispute that it does exist, and is in popular use, with which I have no problem, I wondered where it came from?

Also, I would expect that a phrase such as 'the season's best to you' (Beanachtai an tSéasúir Duit) was more pure or true to the language and its origins.

Jack.

A lot of the modern Irish language is based on Ireland's Christian heritage, so I would think that Nollaig shona duit/daoibh is a perfectly valid thing to say.

:) David
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Post December 11 2005, 22:21 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
And, for what it's worth, "Nollaig Shona" IS a direct translation of "Happy Christmas." "Nollaig" is the Irish word for "Christmas" and "sona" (lenited here because "Nollaig" is feminine) is "happy."

Most languages were "pagan" at some point in the game (Hebrew being the one exception I can think of), so I don't think that changes the meaning of "Nollaig Shona" in any way, shape or form.

Does anyone know the etymology of "Nollaig"? Given that it's also used as the Irish form of names that mean "nativity" (such as "Noel"), I'd say it's identification with Christmas is pretty well established, whatever it may have meant once upon a time.

Redwolf


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