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Post August 16 2005, 3:17 AM
canadianirish
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Posts: 2
Could anyone translate my sons name to gaelic lettering? His name is Owen

 
Post August 16 2005, 3:19 AM
wdsci
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Posts: 19066
canadianirish wrote:Could anyone translate my sons name to gaelic lettering? His name is Owen

There is no Gaelic lettering. Irish uses the Latin alphabet, just like English. Additionally, names don't change in translation. There is an Irish name, Eoin (I believe), which could be considered an equivalent of Owen since it sounds more or less the same. You could use that if you want.

:) David
Last edited by wdsci on August 16 2005, 3:20 AM, edited 1 time in total.
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Post August 16 2005, 3:20 AM
Redwolf
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Posts: 57599
I'm not sure what you mean by "Gaelic lettering." Irish uses the same letters as English.

There are two Irish names that roughly correspond in pronunciation to "Owen." One is "Eoin" (a form of "John"), and the other is "Eoghain."

Redwolf

Post August 16 2005, 3:28 AM
canadianirish
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Posts: 2
I noticed that their is no (W) in the Gaelic alphabet, and that I simply wanted to know the font for the four letters, O-W-E-N. Alas, I guess Eoin will have to do, since it is said to be a synonym for the name.

Thanks guys.

Goooo night. :)

Post August 16 2005, 3:33 AM
Redwolf
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Posts: 57599
canadianirish wrote:I noticed that their is no (W) in the Gaelic alphabet, and that I simply wanted to know the font for the four letters, O-W-E-N. Alas, I guess Eoin will have to do, since it is said to be a synonym for the name.

Thanks guys.

Goooo night. :)


Well, I don't know that it's a "synonym," as I don't know the etymology for "Owen" (which I believe is a Welsh name...Cymro??? Unless "Owen" is a form of "John," it's not a synonym), but it does SOUND similar.

As far as fonts go, there are fonts available for download under our "fonts" heading, as well as all over the internet. You don't need a translation forum for that.

Redwolf

Post August 16 2005, 3:47 AM
wdsci
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Posts: 19066
canadianirish wrote:I noticed that their is no (W) in the Gaelic alphabet, and that I simply wanted to know the font for the four letters, O-W-E-N. Alas, I guess Eoin will have to do, since it is said to be a synonym for the name.

Thanks guys.

Goooo night. :)

Not really . . . as we've said, there is no Gaelic alphabet. When people say that, what they mean is that Irish does not use the "w" from the Latin alphabet - just like English does not use the "ú". Recently, though, Irish has adopted or adapted some words from other languages with w's in them.

You would have a very hard time finding a textual font without a "w" in it, that's for sure! :lach: Just get any font you want and write "Owen" in it, it's not that hard.

:) David
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Post August 16 2005, 22:57 PM
Cymro-Breatnach
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Redwolf wrote:Well, I don't know that it's a "synonym," as I don't know the etymology for "Owen" (which I believe is a Welsh name.)


Owen is a very common name in Wales and is an anglicisation of the name Owain which is also commonly used. It means well-born and has been used for centuries. One of the most notable bearers of the name was Owain Glyndŵr, a 15th century hero who led a revolt against the English.

:wink:
"Dúid" Breatnach an tí. Is Breatnach deas mé.
Cymru 11 Lloegr 9 (Wales 11 England 9) Ha Ha!

My Irish is not very good, but I have kickass Welsh! I don't make mistakes in Welsh.

Post August 16 2005, 23:12 PM
Brigid_CloverMoon
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Posts: 1533
Try searching google for a font called Unical. Those are the "celtic" style fonts you see all the time. You will find a "w" included in almost any font package unless its a foreign font face such as Chinese or Sanskrit.
Slán go fóill,

Aingeal

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Post August 16 2005, 23:22 PM
Redwolf
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Posts: 57599
Cymro-Breatnach wrote:
Redwolf wrote:Well, I don't know that it's a "synonym," as I don't know the etymology for "Owen" (which I believe is a Welsh name.)


Owen is a very common name in Wales and is an anglicisation of the name Owain which is also commonly used. It means well-born and has been used for centuries. One of the most notable bearers of the name was Owain Glyndŵr, a 15th century hero who led a revolt against the English.

:wink:


Oh...I remember now! I saw a great documentary on Owain Glyndŵr on "Battlefield Britain"...that's why I figured the name must be Welsh.

"Eoin" and "Owen" are definitely not synonymous, then, even though they sound similar. "Eoin" is an Irishization of the Hebrew name that has become "John" in English (the better-known "Seán" being an Irishization of the French form of the name..."Jean"). The traditional Irish name "Eoghan" (which is also pronounced somewhat like "Owen") is said to mean "born of the yew."

Why not go with the Welsh spelling, canadianirish, if you want the name in its Celtic form? That would be much more authentic.

Redwolf



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