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What is the Gaelic word for "moon"?

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Post March 22 2005, 1:44 AM
Kwekubo
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 266
Gaeilgeoir wrote:
Méabh wrote:it's poetic and not common speech

but it just occurred to me: "roimh ré"
does that refer to the moon in some way?


Interesting...So, before and after the show Ros na Rún when they show the guy's arm w/ the tattoo Foras na Gaeilge, the part on the screen where it says "Ré nua don Theanga" is 'poetic'?? :confused: Are you sure, Lynn?


ré = era

Ré nua don teanga = A new era for the language. It was the slogan Foras na Gaeilge used as the body was being set up, and they still use it sometimes, eg on those stingers for Ros na Rún.

roimh ré = a while ago, lit. before a period.

The moon reference is indeed quite poetic. It's not the most common meaning, despite Ó Dónaill.

 
Post March 22 2005, 1:47 AM
Méabh
Scríbhneoir d'Éigean
 
Posts: 23921
GRMA a chara
Is é Christian Stoehr mo chroí
Dáta pósadh: 16 Deireadh Fómhair 2010

Post March 22 2005, 1:47 AM
Cymro-Breatnach
Giostaire
 
Posts: 4205
Gealach looks as if it's cognate with 'golau' (light) in Welsh. :wink:
"Dúid" Breatnach an tí. Is Breatnach deas mé.
Cymru 11 Lloegr 9 (Wales 11 England 9) Ha Ha!

My Irish is not very good, but I have kickass Welsh! I don't make mistakes in Welsh.

Post March 22 2005, 2:52 AM
Gaeilgeoir
Giostaire
 
Posts: 3330
LOL!!
Ok, Lynn :D

Thanks alot, Kwekubo!
Le meas,
Mícheál



Méabh wrote:Ros na Rún is not the best yardstick for proper Irish

Kwekubo wrote:ré = era

Ré nua don teanga = A new era for the language. It was the slogan Foras na Gaeilge used as the body was being set up, and they still use it sometimes, eg on those stingers for Ros na Rún.

roimh ré = a while ago, lit. before a period.

The moon reference is indeed quite poetic. It's not the most common meaning, despite Ó Dónaill.
Image

Labhair í agus mairfaidh sí! Éire Abú!
As always, wait for others' opinions on translations until a consensus has been reached.

Image

Post March 22 2005, 3:14 AM
Tim
Scéalaí Mór
 
Posts: 2934
More strangely, the Japanese names appear to be closely linked to the European names in some way - but that's another story...


The words for the days of the week and the planets are European influenced.

yobi=day of the week

sei= planet

Su - nichiyobi (nichi=sun)

Mo - getsuyobi (getsu=moon)

Tu - kayobi (ka=fire) [kasei=Mars]

W - suiyobi (sui = water) [suisei=Mercury]

Th - mokuyobi (moku=wood) [mokusei=Jupiter]

F- kinyobi (kin=gold) [kinsei=Venus]

Sa - doyobi (do=soil) [dosei=Saturn]

The connections between the meanings for the days in Japanese and their respective "gods" are obvious when you look at it this way.
Wait for at least two confirmations or corrections on this/these translations. Completion of a good translation may take time. Go ra' ma'ad.

Tim

Post March 22 2005, 5:58 AM
Ossian
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 389
How would one translate the verb "moon" into Irish? As in prankishly flashing your bottom at passers by.
Nothing I translate in Irish is reliable, so please wait for confirmation

Ne vous fiez à aucune de mes traductions irlandaises sans l'approbation d'un locuteur chevronné.

Post March 22 2005, 8:41 AM
Tim
Scéalaí Mór
 
Posts: 2934
I wrote a little haiku about that a while back. I just said "I showed my ass". But there may be a more idiomatic way to say it . . . as a matter of fact, knowing Irish, I'm SURE there is. :lol:

The haiku post:

ftopic21586-0-asc-30.html
Wait for at least two confirmations or corrections on this/these translations. Completion of a good translation may take time. Go ra' ma'ad.

Tim

Post March 22 2005, 18:09 PM
Ossian
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 389
Timocein wrote:I wrote a little haiku about that a while back. I just said "I showed my ass". But there may be a more idiomatic way to say it . . . as a matter of fact, knowing Irish, I'm SURE there is. :lol:


So, any native or fluent speakers up for tackling this?
Nothing I translate in Irish is reliable, so please wait for confirmation

Ne vous fiez à aucune de mes traductions irlandaises sans l'approbation d'un locuteur chevronné.

Post March 22 2005, 19:29 PM
Antóin
Giostaire
 
Posts: 4296
Timocein wrote:I wrote a little haiku about that a while back. I just said "I showed my ass". But there may be a more idiomatic way to say it . . . as a matter of fact, knowing Irish, I'm SURE there is. :lol:

The haiku post:

ftopic21586-0-asc-30.html


The ancient Irish did it digfferently; they lifted the front of their tunics and displayed their ------.

Post March 23 2005, 13:41 PM
Tim
Scéalaí Mór
 
Posts: 2934
So, in ancient Ireland, it wasn't a "moon" it was more of a prehistorical rocket type of thingy.

Anyway, Antóin, you are the excellent Irish speaker around. How would you say "moon"?
Wait for at least two confirmations or corrections on this/these translations. Completion of a good translation may take time. Go ra' ma'ad.

Tim


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