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mo duinne

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Post May 17 2004, 9:58 AM
Senrei
New Arrival
 
Posts: 5
I hope I'm not offending anyone by choosing this forum to ask my question, I just didn't know if I should make a new topic or not ...

Anyhow, I am currently reading a novel and it has a lot of gaelic within it and mostly there is translations or you get the drift of what is meant, all but this .. the husband within the novel calls his wife this ... if you could help me and tell me its meaning, I would greatly appreciate it ... many thanks.

mo duinne

 
Post May 17 2004, 10:27 AM
shamrok24
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 347
You can always make a new topic when you have a question. No question is too big or too small.

Mo duinne

I do believe it means "My brown one", but wait for more input. I am not sure about the connotation here so wait for some more input on it :mrgreen: .
Scott

----------------------------------------------

If you can't first learn to laugh at yourself, how can you ever laugh at someone else?

Post May 17 2004, 10:46 AM
rajul
Anseo again
 
Posts: 17
'Mo dhoinne' may be a mishearing or misspelling of 'Mo dhuine'

However ' mo dhoinne' could,we suppose, mean ' My browness'.
In what circumstances or context have you heard this used?



Mo dhuine means ' My man'.
Do dhuine means 'Your man' [Yer man] As in 'Yer man Shamrok24 is an awful bluffer and a clone too. Yes,clone.



rajul

Post May 17 2004, 11:00 AM
irishgaelictranslator
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3010
Shamrok,

it hasn't anything to do with Brown.

As rajul said, in Hiberno English you can refer to a man as "Yer man", and to a woman as "Yer one".

So, you could hear something like "Look at yer one over there, she's a fine thing". Which would me "Look over at the lady there, she is quite pleasant on the eye".

Eoin

Post May 17 2004, 11:35 AM
Senrei
New Arrival
 
Posts: 5
Thankyou all for your help ... I thought perhaps an extract out of the novel might help in translation ....

He smiled then, and bent to kiss me on the forehead. "I'll be home to my supper, mo duinne. Keep ye well."

Post May 17 2004, 11:40 AM
MQ
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 276
Just out of interest, what is the title of the book, and who is the author? It might be a writer who hasn't much knowledge of Irish, which would explain the spelling given.
Michael

Post May 17 2004, 11:44 AM
Méabh
Scríbhneoir d'Éigean
 
Posts: 23921
I kinda remember this one...it's been mentioned before *goes to search archives*

Could it be Scottish, the pet name?

ftopic8843.html&highlight=duinne

you might have to just ask the author :?
Is é Christian Stoehr mo chroí
Dáta pósadh: 16 Deireadh Fómhair 2010

Post May 17 2004, 12:01 PM
Senrei
New Arrival
 
Posts: 5
The author is Diana Gabaldon, it is her Outlander Series.

I just came across a site that has a Q&A/FAQ section where someone asks a question about mo duinne, and there is an answer that would more than likely hopefully help you all helping .. but it still isn't answering the meaning part of the word ..

Here is the question, answered by the author ...

Q: Why doesn't Jamie use the endearment "mo duinne" in Voyager?
A: Er....well....{cough}. He doesn't say "mo duinne" in Voyager, because between Dragonfly in Amber and Voyager, I acquired the gracious assistance of a native speaker of Gaelic, one Iain MacKinnon Taylor (who kindly advised on all the Gaelic bits in Voyager). Mr. Taylor informed me that while "mo duinne" had the right words for what I meant to convey, it wasn't idiomatically correct--that is, the proper expression would be"mo nighean donn". So I used that in Voyager, wishing (as always {grin}) to be as accurate as possible.

Post May 17 2004, 12:10 PM
MQ
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 276
Iain MacKinnon Taylor - sounds like he hails from Scotland, so Méabh was right, I think.
Michael

Post May 17 2004, 12:39 PM
Méabh
Scríbhneoir d'Éigean
 
Posts: 23921
could it be
mo nighean donn = my dark(as in the opposite of fair) daughter?

I think nighean = iníon
Is é Christian Stoehr mo chroí
Dáta pósadh: 16 Deireadh Fómhair 2010


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