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Translation: "soldier/warrior/hero" "protected"

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Post February 13 2012, 6:34 AM
red_fox_85
New Arrival
 
Posts: 3
Giving a gift to a soldier of Irish descent...a leather cuff engraved with a message in gaelic

I'm thinking "soldier" or "warrior" or even "my hero" and "protected" or some more elegant word for being kept safe from all harm.

He's sort of a lone wolf warrior type- a sniper- who's been deployed several times and deployment's coming around again...I worry for him ;(


Many thanks to anyone for their help!
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Post February 13 2012, 9:22 AM
An Chionnfhaolach
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 213
An Faol fánach = is the wandering wolf

saighdiúir = soldier

Gaiscíoch= warrior

mo laoch= my hero, a laoch or a laoichín= when used to address him (laoichín used more as a term of endearment- my little hero)

Cosantóir= protector

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Post February 13 2012, 11:47 AM
Breandán
Giostaire
 
Posts: 4409
Cosantóir is "protector".

For "protected" perhaps faoi choimirce.

Post February 13 2012, 22:21 PM
An Chionnfhaolach
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 213
Fé/ faoi/ fá chosaint= under protection i.e protected
fém' scáth chosantach: under my protective shadow maybe....
Last edited by An Chionnfhaolach on February 13 2012, 23:02 PM, edited 2 times in total.

Post February 13 2012, 22:37 PM
red_fox_85
New Arrival
 
Posts: 3
Thank you both :)

@ An Chionnfhaolach, would that be

Laoch/Gaiscíoch fa Chosaint,

or do I have that backwards?
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Post February 13 2012, 23:21 PM
An Chionnfhaolach
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 213
No you have it nearly right... Gaiscíoch/ laoch fá/ fé/ faoi chosaint... means warrior/ hero under the protection of... for it to make more sense you wouldhave to say warrior/ hero under the protection of something or someone.

If you want it as in under my protection: Gaiscíoch/ laoch fém' chosaint

If you want to say warrior/ gaiscíoch under the protection of the Government: Gaiscíoch/ laoch fé chosaint an rialtais

I don't really know what you want to say or what you really mean in English, give me th ewhole sentance that you wish to translate:

it depends on what you want to say: My hero and protected
Mo laoch agus é cosainte- literally my hero and he protected, but thats the correct translation of that perticular phrase.

If you are addressing him you wouldn't use mo laoch, instead you would have to say a laoich or a ghaiscígh.

A better way around that would be to put the name of your love one lets just say his name is Mike- A Mhaidhc, mo laoch cosainte- Mike, my protected hero

Post February 13 2012, 23:40 PM
Breandán
Giostaire
 
Posts: 4409
Faoi is standard, and are dialect forms. If red_fox_85 has a preference for a specific dialect it would be better to keep all elements of the translation in that dialect, rather than mix them up. If not, it is usual to either provide a standard translation, or alternatively to specify what the dialect is so that the OP is aware that the translation isn't in standard Irish.

Similarly, cosanta would be the standard pst participle form of the word cosain "to protect". (Is cosainte a Munster form?)


Since this is for an inscription on a leather cuff to be worn by the recipient, perhaps:

Cosain mo laoch. "Protect my hero."

Post February 14 2012, 0:06 AM
An Chionnfhaolach
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 213
Breandán wrote:Faoi is standard, and are dialect forms. If red_fox_85 has a preference for a specific dialect it would be better to keep all elements of the translation in that dialect, rather than mix them up. If not, it is usual to either provide a standard translation, or alternatively to specify what the dialect is so that the OP is aware that the translation isn't in standard Irish.

Similarly, cosanta would be the standard pst participle form of the word cosain "to protect". (Is cosainte a Munster form?)


Since this is for an inscription on a leather cuff to be worn by the recipient, perhaps:

Cosain mo laoch. "Protect my hero."


Sorry about the dialect thing will try to give a more standard variation in future or specify otherwise.

We tend to use cosaint instead of cosain in any sentence. I have rarely heard or seen cosain before. We tend to add a t on to words at the end like: éigint = éigin. Its a bit weird... as for cosanta I've seen from focal.ie that its the standard alright. Not really sure about it, because its very difficult to hear the difference in speech. As we use the cosaint more I must have taken it as the briathar instead of what it should be under the caighdeán- abr.

Post February 14 2012, 16:03 PM
red_fox_85
New Arrival
 
Posts: 3
Thank you very much for your input An Chionnfhaolach & Breandán!

Breandán, Cosain mo laoch. "Protect my hero." is spot on. I think I'll be using that.
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