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Eng to scottish Gaelic translation please

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Post November 21 2011, 11:10 AM
ohagan89
New Arrival
 
Posts: 4
Hi there,

For My passed fathers ten year anniversary im wanting to make him a plaque, Im after the translation of 'You are my sunshine' into scottish Gaelic, I want to make very sure that its the scottish translation and not the irish translation so hesitant to use online 'gaelic' automatic translators. Can somebody please help me.
Thankyou

 
Post November 21 2011, 20:35 PM
ohagan89
New Arrival
 
Posts: 4
Bump,

I left this translation to the very last minute and im meant to be getting it done today!

Post November 21 2011, 21:21 PM
CaoimhínSF
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 5554
For My passed fathers ten year anniversary im wanting to make him a plaque, Im after the translation of 'You are my sunshine' into scottish Gaelic, I want to make very sure that its the scottish translation and not the irish translation so hesitant to use online 'gaelic' automatic translators. Can somebody please help me.
Thankyou


A compound word like "sunshine" is relatively easy to create in English, because English, as a Germanic language, builds compound words relatively easily. It is not always so easy to do that in Irish or Scottish Gaelic, although they do have compound words (probably more in modern times than they used to have).

There is a multiple-word expression for "sunshine", which is deàrrsadh na grèine, or "shining of the sun". It can also be written as deàrsadh na grèine, deàrsaich na grèine, or deàlradh na grèine. Modern Scottish Gaelic sometimes has multiple forms of the same word, some of which will seem more "old-fashioned" to some speakers or may be particular to certain areas, but in this case I think you could use any of these forms and be understood.

Given the structure of the expression in Gaelic, I'm not sure it sounds entirely logical to put a possessive pronoun like "my" in front of it, but that was probably true the first time it was done in English, too, and I'm sure it's been done before in Gaelic. You would certainly be understood, so your choices would then be:

Is tu mo dheàrrsadh na grèine
Is tu mo dheàrsadh na grèine
Is tu mo dheàrsaich na grèine
Is tu mo dheàlradh na grèine

The extra "h" shows up in each case after the initial "d" for grammatical and pronunciation reasons, because the word mo ("my") has been placed in front of it.

Edited to add the Is tu part which I had forgotten to include.
Last edited by CaoimhínSF on November 22 2011, 7:17 AM, edited 1 time in total.
I'm still a learner, so be sure to get input from others, especially for tattoos.

Post November 21 2011, 21:51 PM
ohagan89
New Arrival
 
Posts: 4
Thankyou very much for your help,
Im confused as to wether or not the 'You are... ' Has been put into the translation? my father was from Glasgow and be close to 90 years old if he was alive today. I want to get it as close to original as possible for him.

Post November 21 2011, 23:17 PM
ohagan89
New Arrival
 
Posts: 4
mo dheàlradh na grèine

So you this word You are my sunshine??

Wow i never imagined there would be so much to it!

Post November 22 2011, 7:16 AM
CaoimhínSF
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 5554
Sorry, I did forget to include the "you are" part:

Is tu mo dheàrrsadh na grèine
or
'S tu mo dheàrrsadh na grèine

's is an abbreviated form of is, and is used a lot, so you can take your choice.
I'm still a learner, so be sure to get input from others, especially for tattoos.



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