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How to pronounce "Tine Ghealáin"?

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Post October 20 2011, 3:12 AM
alderroots
Anseo again
 
Posts: 11
Can anyone help me with pronouncing "Tine Ghealáin"?
A quote about Tine Ghealáin from a celtic mythology/folklore dictionary:
Irish folkloric figure. What is called in other lands the will-o’-the-wisp, a light seen over bogs at night, was said in Ireland to be a lantern carried by a dead gambler doomed to wander forever because, although his soul was too stained to enter heaven, he had won his way out of hell by beating the devil at cards. His name was applied to the hollowed-out turnips (in the New World, pumpkins) used at samhain, when the veils between the worlds were thin.

Also, does this mean that "Tine Ghealáin" is synonymous with "Jack-o-Lantern"? If not, what are Jack-o-Lanterns/carved pumpkins called modernly in Irish?

 
Post October 20 2011, 7:40 AM
CaoimhínSF
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 5554
Can anyone help me with pronouncing "Tine Ghealáin"?
A quote about Tine Ghealáin from a celtic mythology/folklore dictionary:
Irish folkloric figure. What is called in other lands the will-o’-the-wisp, a light seen over bogs at night, was said in Ireland to be a lantern carried by a dead gambler doomed to wander forever because, although his soul was too stained to enter heaven, he had won his way out of hell by beating the devil at cards. His name was applied to the hollowed-out turnips (in the New World, pumpkins) used at samhain, when the veils between the worlds were thin.

Also, does this mean that "Tine Ghealáin" is synonymous with "Jack-o-Lantern"? If not, what are Jack-o-Lanterns/carved pumpkins called modernly in Irish?


The Scottish custom of putting lit candles in turnips is indeed the source of the American Jack-O-Lantern custom (candles in pumpkins). In Irish, they can be called tine ghealaín ("lightning fire") or Seán na gealaí ("John of the moon").

tine ghealáin
"TYINN-yuh YALL-awn" [in some dialects: "CHINN-yuh YALL-awn"

Seán na gealaí
"Shawn nuh GYALL-ee"

In each case, the "yall" rhymes with "pal", not "yawl"
Last edited by CaoimhínSF on October 21 2011, 6:12 AM, edited 1 time in total.
I'm still a learner, so be sure to get input from others, especially for tattoos.

Post October 21 2011, 4:08 AM
alderroots
Anseo again
 
Posts: 11
Thank you so much!

So it is Tine Ghealaín, not Tine Ghealáin?

Post October 21 2011, 5:14 AM
Breandán
Giostaire
 
Posts: 4409
No, that's just a typo.

I'd say:

tine ghealáin "Will-o'-the-Wisp, summer lightning"
CHIN-ih YAL-awn(y)
/t´in´ə γ´æ:Lɑ:n´/

Post October 21 2011, 6:13 AM
CaoimhínSF
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 5554
No, that's just a typo.


Yep, I'm a poor typist. I've corrected it.
I'm still a learner, so be sure to get input from others, especially for tattoos.



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