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Enya - "Now We Are Free"

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Post April 02 2004, 16:58 PM
johnsone
New Arrival
 
Posts: 1
I was wondering if anyone could translate Enya's song "Now We Are Free". Thanks so much!!!

 
Post April 02 2004, 17:04 PM
oisin718
Andúileach IGTF
 
Posts: 14098
johnsone wrote:I was wondering if anyone could translate Enya's song "Now We Are Free". Thanks so much!!!


It's not an Enya song, and it's not in a real language. It's made-up syllables to sound like a language and carry a tune.

Post April 02 2004, 17:41 PM
JSmith13
Scríbhneoir d'Éigean
 
Posts: 20540
johnsone wrote:I was wondering if anyone could translate Enya's song "Now We Are Free". Thanks so much!!!


Tá saoirse sinn, anois.
Beidh ár lá linn.......go luath!!

I'm a beginner. Wait for more input with my translations.

Image

Post April 02 2004, 22:07 PM
Brian
Andúileach IGTF
 
Posts: 14819
From Google
I have no clue about this lyrics actualy i can't recognize language.... but you should read this...


QUOTE

I've read this whole thread about the lyrics and I can come to the conclusion that they either mean something or nothing.

I've seen ancient languages (Farsi, Egyptian, Greek, Gaelic, Hebrew) in all the responses. Whether Simon comes up with his interpretation in Egyptian, remains to be seen.

It may be true, also, that Lisa Gerrard makes up the lyrics. One also has to remember, though, that Gerrard was a part of Dead Can Dance that brought to life again some older songs of medieval times, including medieval music's Moorish influences.

But favorite interpretation is this: that if you can Farsi, Egyptian, Greek, Gaelic and Hebrew out of this song, then it could be a simple evoking of racial memories, especially if you were a centurion conquering Persia, Egypt, Greece, the British Isles (and let's remember that the Celts were from the mainland of Europe) and Judea (Jerusalem et al).

It seems that Gerrard is channeling all these languages into a pattern that melds into one stream of gibberish. But look at this from the perspective of a centurion in Roman times - he could have regarded it the same way (gibberish) and had constructed the song out of found words from any of these languages BECAUSE he may have come into contact with any and all of these peoples!

Rome touched all of these cultures, and to think of Rome as a melting pot of many early cultures could be accurate. Think of the presence of Djimon Hunsu in the movie. And think of the ancient legend of the Tower of Babel.

Think of the song as a fusion of cultural memory. (No one's ever thought of Gothic as a possible language for the lyrics, but remember - who knows what THAT would have sounded like! The language of the Ostrogoths and Visigoths is a dead language... Manx is headed or has gone that way....)

Look at the English language now. It has French words, Saracen words, German root words, Norse words.... take a course in the geography and history of language in you'll see what I might be talking about.

Post April 02 2004, 22:09 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
oisin718 wrote:
johnsone wrote:I was wondering if anyone could translate Enya's song "Now We Are Free". Thanks so much!!!


It's not an Enya song, and it's not in a real language. It's made-up syllables to sound like a language and carry a tune.


Basically New Age lilting?

Redwolf

Post April 03 2004, 6:24 AM
Ailill
Andúileach IGTF
 
Posts: 10981
The Roman Empire certainly was a melting pot. There's a temple to Mithras here in London (the ruins are still here).
"Tá an saol mór lán den fhilíocht ag an té dar dual a thuigbheáil agus ní thráfaidh an tobar go deo na ndeor."
Seosamh Mac Grianna, Mo Bhealach Féin

Post April 03 2004, 17:25 PM
Ossian
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 389
Wow! I didn't know there was still a temple to Mithras in London. I would think the church would have done away with it, but I guess not. Mithras' worship really was widespread back in the day, but I guess wherever the Roman soldiers went so went Mithras. That's very interesting.
Nothing I translate in Irish is reliable, so please wait for confirmation

Ne vous fiez à aucune de mes traductions irlandaises sans l'approbation d'un locuteur chevronné.

Post April 03 2004, 19:48 PM
Ailill
Andúileach IGTF
 
Posts: 10981
There's the ruins of a temple there. It seems that back in the day, Christianity was just one of many underground cults operating in London and throughout the Empire.
"Tá an saol mór lán den fhilíocht ag an té dar dual a thuigbheáil agus ní thráfaidh an tobar go deo na ndeor."
Seosamh Mac Grianna, Mo Bhealach Féin

Post April 03 2004, 21:46 PM
Antóin
Giostaire
 
Posts: 4301
Ossian wrote:Wow! I didn't know there was still a temple to Mithras in London. I would think the church would have done away with it, but I guess not. Mithras' worship really was widespread back in the day, but I guess wherever the Roman soldiers went so went Mithras. That's very interesting.


In all probability the Church did do away with it. The ruins were only discovered during clearance operations of bombed buildings after the second world war.

Post April 03 2004, 22:55 PM
oisin718
Andúileach IGTF
 
Posts: 14098
If we something from the author of the lyrics explaining what he or she had in mind, I'd accept it. However, enduring countless tormented hours of English class being asked to identify what an author's purpose of idea was, I learned to loathe trying to decipher the meaning behind lyrics. That post posted by Paul is nice and makes sense, but then it's entirely possible the author just thought "This sounds pretty, let's put it in."

I enjoy Adiemus, "Songs of Sanctuary" and "Cantata Mundi," and those sound like a language and evoke ideas and thoughts, but they are not a language: they are phonemes used to sound like a language and behave like a language, but not to have any meaning conveyed by the singer: the listener creates the meaning himself.


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