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mise eire poem... tattoo???

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Post December 28 2010, 17:15 PM
cmon_the_rebels
New Arrival
 
Posts: 8
Hello everyone, this is my first post...

ok so im strongly considering getting padraig pearse's poem, mise eire, tattood down my side..

ive been long searching something with this sort of amount of text which is distinctly irish to help me remember where i came from as i venture further from my home.. i can think of no better man to have written it than pearse himself aswell.. however, if i decide to get it i want to expel any doubts i have surrounding the poem and if some of you could help me out with your opinions and knowledge it would be extremely appreciated!!!

the poem reads;

Mise Éire:
Sine mé ná an Chailleach Bhéarra

Mór mo ghlóir:
Mé a rug Cú Chulainn cróga.

Mór mo náir:
Mo chlann féin a dhíol a máthair.

Mór mo phian:
Bithnaimhde do mo shíorchiapadh.

Mór mo bhrón:
D'éag an dream inar chuireas dóchas.

Mise Éire:
Uaigní mé ná an Chailleach Bhéarra


and in english it translates as:

I am Ireland:
I am older than the old woman of Beare.

Great my glory:
I who bore Cuchulainn, the brave.

Great my shame:
My own children who sold their mother.

Great my pain:
My irreconcilable enemy who harrasses me continually...

Great my sorrow
That crowd, in whom I placed my trust, died.

I am Ireland:
I am lonelier than the old woman of Beare.


If anyone can help me achieve a greater understanding of what pearse is saying in the poem that would be sweet. My doubts relate to the negativity of the poem it begins with a fantasic line about irelands glory and cuculhainn.. the next three parts all appear negative however... can anyone find any positives or other meanings in the lines about shame, pain and sorrow?? my concern is that the poem almost insults ireland where id like to have a tattoo that compliments our country or empahises some of our positives attributes such as irelands beauty! It was written in 1912, before we gained the free state or independence from britain so the situation then may refelect why pearse appears to portray the country in somewhat of a sad state..

i have searched the internet endlessly looking for info on this poem. one thing i keep noticing is that many versions online seem to shorten the poem by cutting out the great my pain and great my sorrow parts.. i cant get my head around this either does anyone know why it gets shortened??

thanks for taking your time to read if anyone knows anything about this poem or is particulary good at interpreting poems id love to hear what you have to say, all opinions are welcome. :mrgreen:

 
Post December 28 2010, 17:42 PM
Bodhránbob
Giostaire
 
Posts: 3155
It is what it is..the truth. Ireland has its glory ..and its treachery at the hands of its own people too.
It is what it is..its not an insult in my opinion...Wish everyone were that truthful.
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Wisdom is never on the menu, you have to own the restaurant.

Post December 28 2010, 17:59 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
I think the poem loses its impact if the "negative" parts are left off. Pain, sorrow, shame and treachery are very much a part of Ireland's history. The entire poignancy of the poem -- which is emphasized in the final line -- rests in the fact that this ancient land of heroes was not only attacked from without, but hurt, abandoned and betrayed by her own people.

It is a sad poem, and it's meant to be.

Oh, btw, it's "Éire." "Eire" means "burden."

Redwolf

Post December 28 2010, 20:43 PM
scoobytyson
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 6550
I have the book Padraic Pearse Rogha Dánta - Selected Poems and this is what it gives.

Mise Éire:
Sine mé ná an Chailleach Bhéarra.

Mór mo ghlóir:
Mé a rug Cú Chulainn cróga.

Mór mo náir:
Mo chlann féin a dhíol a máthair.

Mise Éire:
Uaigní mé ná an Chailleach Bhéarra
The money-grabbing wankers who control this site can ban me too. Talk about recruiting trolls! I've spent enough time putting money in their pockets.

Post December 28 2010, 23:19 PM
cmon_the_rebels
New Arrival
 
Posts: 8
Hey guys, cheers for getting back to me.. im keen to know what trechory ye've confirmed the irish people have undergone to deserve its emphasis in the poem... forgive my ignorance, the vast majority of irish history ive studied were from 1870-1930ish (in the JC and LC) not much springs to mind in regards to betrayal apart from the obvious treaty and the civil war but they were a bit after the poem was written in 1912 so might ye know which particular incidents pearse is on about??

cheers for the correction redwolf i get eire needs a fada, just dont know how to do it on the keyboard..

the last post is exactly what im trying to get at i cant figure out why there is shortened versions of it out there... does anybody know???

thanks for reading

Post December 28 2010, 23:26 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
cmon_the_rebels wrote:Hey guys, cheers for getting back to me.. im keen to know what trechory ye've confirmed the irish people have undergone to deserve its emphasis in the poem... forgive my ignorance, the vast majority of irish history ive studied were from 1870-1930ish (in the JC and LC) not much springs to mind in regards to betrayal apart from the obvious treaty and the civil war but they were a bit after the poem was written in 1912 so might ye know which particular incidents pearse is on about??

cheers for the correction redwolf i get eire needs a fada, just dont know how to do it on the keyboard..

the last post is exactly what im trying to get at i cant figure out why there is shortened versions of it out there... does anybody know???

thanks for reading


To get fadas here, all you have to do is click on the appropriate box above the posting form.

Redwolf

Post December 28 2010, 23:56 PM
fiairefeadha
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 6121
Hey guys, cheers for getting back to me.. im keen to know what trechory ye've confirmed the irish people have undergone[/quote] For a little starter At the battle of Ballinamuck (1798) 842 of 859 French soldiers were taken prisoner but only 20 of the 1000 Irish rebels were extended this priviledge. The 500 or so Irish survivors of the battle who surrendered were surrounded by British Bayonetmen and slaughtered wholesale ,the British soldiers being told not to waste bullets on them. The 200 wounded Irishmen were all hung.Surrender was a luxury rarely given to the Irish but a general rule of battle elsewhere.

Post December 29 2010, 0:11 AM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599

Post December 29 2010, 22:51 PM
cmon_the_rebels
New Arrival
 
Posts: 8
ballinamuck is a horrific story, i guess it ties in with when he write of irelands sorrow.. however i don't think it has anything to do with shame as our own people by being murdered doesn't relate to betrayal... can anybody get at what pearse is on about when he says 'my own children who sold their mother'???
Cheers

Post December 29 2010, 22:59 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
cmon_the_rebels wrote:ballinamuck is a horrific story, i guess it ties in with when he write of irelands sorrow.. however i don't think it has anything to do with shame as our own people by being murdered doesn't relate to betrayal... can anybody get at what pearse is on about when he says 'my own children who sold their mother'???
Cheers


Throughout Irish history, various Irish leaders have worked WITH the English or against them, depending on whether or not doing so would advance their personal cause, regardless of what might be best for the country as a whole. That's one reason there are so many "coats of arms" (an English tradition, not an Irish one) associated with various Irish names...at one point or another, the person who was awarded those arms did something heroic on behalf of the English crown...most likely AGAINST another Irish family or faction. If you read Irish history thoroughly, you'll find lots of instances of Irish kings and chieftains supporting the English claims when it suited them.

You have to realize that early Irish history was one of tribalism...there wasn't the sense of it being a nation, as such. Tribal leaders would work with whomever they thought might advance their own cause against their neighbors.

Even well into more modern times, there were people who thought it best to work with the English rather than strive for independence. Most independence movements were ultimately brought low by informers from within their own ranks.

Even the 1916 Easter Rising was met with either indifference or outright antipathy on the part of many people in Ireland. It really wasn't until after the brutal execution of the leaders that people really got on board with the idea of (yet another) revolution.

Pearse was calling for unification under the banner of Irish nationalism...something that hadn't happened very often in Irish history before that.

All countries have histories that include at least as much treachery, corruption and double dealing as heroism. It's tempting to think of a united people working shoulder-to-shoulder for truth and justice, but it's no more true of Irish history than it is of U.S. history.

Redwolf


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