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Post December 12 2010, 20:24 PM
callllllllli
New Arrival
 
Posts: 1
how do you say "i miss you" in gaelic?

 
Post December 12 2010, 20:27 PM
Gumbi
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 5528
Braithim uaim thú (singular)
Await confirmation always, please.

Post December 12 2010, 21:48 PM
Ade
Laoch na nGael
 
Posts: 868
I get the feeling this isn't for a tattoo or anything so major, but it can't hurt to throw in my confirmation here. :lach:
I'm by no means a native Irish speaker.
Wait for confirmation.

Post December 12 2010, 22:36 PM
Breandán
Giostaire
 
Posts: 4409
Gumbi wrote:Braithim uaim thú (singular)

Looks good. :gut:


@Ade: You'd be surprised ...

Post December 13 2010, 2:22 AM
samohickey
Getting Addicted
 
Posts: 75
Braithim uaim thú (singular)

So would that be pronounced?:
"braa-him ooaam oo"
or "BRdAA-HIM OOAAM hOO"

With aa pronounced like the a in "bat" and oo pronounced like the u in "flute".

@Breandán: I know that we'd discussed the "th", but we didn't speak much of it being at the beginning of a word. I'm assuming that it would still be treated as silent, or maybe used to hint the shape of your mouth when saying something. I put the little hOO as a subtle hint that you may not be able to hear, although more experience speakers may?
And the BRdAA to show a slight, ever so gentle, roll of the R. Heheheh!

If.. that makes sense. Haha!
Somhairle Lúcás Ó hÍcidhe

Post December 13 2010, 2:45 AM
Breandán
Giostaire
 
Posts: 4409
samohickey wrote:Braithim uaim thú (singular)

So would that be pronounced?:
"braa-him ooaam oo"
or "BRdAA-HIM OOAAM hOO"

With aa pronounced like the a in "bat" and oo pronounced like the u in "flute".

@Breandán- I know that we'd discussed the "th", but we didn't speak much of it being at the beginning of a word. I'm assuming that it would still be treated as silent, or maybe used to hint the shape of your mouth when saying something. I put the little hOO as a subtle hint that you may not be able to hear, although more experience speakers may?
And the BRdAA to show a slight, ever so gentle, roll of the R. Heheheh!

TH is only silent in certain parts of Connemara (specifically Cois Fhairrge), and only in medial and final positions. At the beginning, it's an h sound, so thú is HOO /hu:/ in all dialects (but OO /u:/ in Scottish Gaelic, I believe).

The th in braithim is medial and therefore silent in Cois Fhairrge, BRAA-im /bra:əm´/, but an h sound in other dialects, BRAA-him /bra:həm´/.

The r in braithim is a strong broad r, not the weak slender r.

Uaim can be heard as a range of pronunciations from OOM(y) /u:m´/ through OO-im(y) /u:əm´/ to WEM(y) /wem´/. The m is slender and therefore has a slight y sound to it: slender m is to broad m, as ñ is to n (roughly speaking). If there is an indistinct vowel /ə/ following, such as in an adverb starting with a, the m will liaise with the vowel to become /mi/ rather than /ma/.

Post December 30 2010, 17:31 PM
samohickey
Getting Addicted
 
Posts: 75
I see! This makes so much more sense. Thank you!
Ugh, I haven't been on here in a while to check this out.
So in Munster, it may sound like?:

"BRAA-im OO-im(y) HOO"

Sounds smooth on the tongue. I like it!
And it makes sense with the way you used the Spanish sounding ñ as an example for the slender m. :)
Roughly of course. Heheh!
Somhairle Lúcás Ó hÍcidhe

Post December 30 2010, 17:33 PM
samohickey
Getting Addicted
 
Posts: 75
ñ is to nya as a slender m is to mya I assume.
Somhairle Lúcás Ó hÍcidhe

Post December 30 2010, 20:10 PM
Breandán
Giostaire
 
Posts: 4409
samohickey wrote:I see! This makes so much more sense. Thank you!
Ugh, I haven't been on here in a while to check this out.
So in Munster, it may sound like?:

"BRAA-im OO-im(y) HOO"

Sounds smooth on the tongue. I like it!
And it makes sense with the way you used the Spanish sounding ñ as an example for the slender m. :)
Roughly of course. Heheh!

In Munster, they'd pronounce the th in the middle of braithim. BRAA-him(y)

The (y) on the slender m in uaim before the thú will be mostly inaudible, but the one on the m in braithim will liase with the u in uaim.

"BRAA-him(y) OO-im HOO"

Post January 01 2011, 9:00 AM
samohickey
Getting Addicted
 
Posts: 75
Ah, that makes sense then. So the first time, in Munster, I had it somewhat right with Braithim. :)
Thank you for your help! Funny how the different dialects change eh? But I'm sure if a Munster person were talking to and Ulster person, we'd get along just fine, eh? I wish that Gaelic were my primary language. Damn my parents for not teaching me from birth. Bahahaha! :D
Somhairle Lúcás Ó hÍcidhe


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