Irish Translation Forum

Ask for Irish Gaelic translations on this English to Irish, Irish to English translator forum.
Irish language translations given on this voluntary community site cannot be guaranteed to be correct. Always ask for a second or third opinion, especially for requests for tattoos, wedding rings, etc.

Amhrán duit?

Ask for free Irish Gaelic translations. Community-based Irish English translator service.

Moderator: Moderators - Módhnóirí

Author Message
Post November 04 2010, 4:42 AM
Daifne
Getting Addicted
 
Posts: 51
Can someone translate Amhrán duit for me please?
Moreover can you give me some general info on the word duit? Because that's a very common word that I often encounter... For exmaple you can tell me what this word conveys in specific sentences...?
Thanks!
I'm not Irish; I learn the language just for fun

 
Post November 04 2010, 5:27 AM
Patchy
Laoch na nGael
 
Posts: 568
Tenerife, Spain, Africa.

Hi Daifne.

'Amhrán duit' means 'A song for you'.

'Duit' means 'For you' (and the 'you' is singular).

Best wishes,
Patchy.

Post November 04 2010, 6:36 AM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
Daifne wrote:Can someone translate Amhrán duit for me please?
Moreover can you give me some general info on the word duit? Because that's a very common word that I often encounter... For exmaple you can tell me what this word conveys in specific sentences...?
Thanks!


Just to expand a bit on what Patchy said...

"Duit" is what's known as a prepositional pronoun...a very commonly used construction in Irish (and one for which English does not have an equivalent). Specifically, it's what happens when you put "do" (to/for) and "tú" ("you"-- singular) together. Do + tú = duit. The full breakdown is:

Dom: to/for me
Duit: to/for you (singular)
Dó: to/for him
Di: to/for her
Dúinn: to/for us
Daoibh: to/for you (plural)
Dóibh: to/for them

Irish uses prepositional pronouns a lot...it's a construct you'll get very used to seeing as you learn about the language. In fact, often where English would use a separate verb for a concept, Irish uses a verb plus a prepositional pronoun. A few examples:

Tá tinneas orm: I'm sick (literally "is sickness on-me." Ar + mé = orm)

Is maith léi bainne: She likes milk (literally "is good with-her milk." Le + sí - léi

Tá Gaeilge aige: He speaks Irish (literally "is Irish at-him." Ag + sé = aige)

Redwolf

Post November 04 2010, 15:07 PM
Daifne
Getting Addicted
 
Posts: 51
Redwolf wrote:
Daifne wrote:Can someone translate Amhrán duit for me please?
Moreover can you give me some general info on the word duit? Because that's a very common word that I often encounter... For exmaple you can tell me what this word conveys in specific sentences...?
Thanks!


Just to expand a bit on what Patchy said...

"Duit" is what's known as a prepositional pronoun...a very commonly used construction in Irish (and one for which English does not have an equivalent). Specifically, it's what happens when you put "do" (to/for) and "tú" ("you"-- singular) together. Do + tú = duit. The full breakdown is:

Dom: to/for me
Duit: to/for you (singular)
Dó: to/for him
Di: to/for her
Dúinn: to/for us
Daoibh: to/for you (plural)
Dóibh: to/for them

Irish uses prepositional pronouns a lot...it's a construct you'll get very used to seeing as you learn about the language. In fact, often where English would use a separate verb for a concept, Irish uses a verb plus a prepositional pronoun. A few examples:

Tá tinneas orm: I'm sick (literally "is sickness on-me." Ar + mé = orm)

Is maith léi bainne: She likes milk (literally "is good with-her milk." Le + sí - léi

Tá Gaeilge aige: He speaks Irish (literally "is Irish at-him." Ag + sé = aige)

Redwolf


Thanks Red! So it's the same for "liom" - with me and "linn" - with us? They're prepositional pronouns too?
I'm not Irish; I learn the language just for fun

Post November 04 2010, 15:27 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
Daifne wrote:
Thanks Red! So it's the same for "liom" - with me and "linn" - with us? They're prepositional pronouns too?


Yep! The complete breakdown for that one is:

Liom
Leat
Leis
Léi
Linn
Libh
Leo

Redwolf

Post November 04 2010, 15:33 PM
Daifne
Getting Addicted
 
Posts: 51
Redwolf wrote:
Daifne wrote:
Thanks Red! So it's the same for "liom" - with me and "linn" - with us? They're prepositional pronouns too?


Yep! The complete breakdown for that one is:

Liom
Leat
Leis
Léi
Linn
Libh
Leo

Redwolf


Go raibh maith agat again! You've been a great help to me since I've registered on this site :D
I'm not Irish; I learn the language just for fun

Post November 04 2010, 15:35 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
No prob!

Should you ever need to look them up, the entire set of prepositional pronouns can usually be found in the "grammar" section of any English/Irish-Irish/English dictionary (which is usually in the center, but sometimes at the end). In the bigger dictionaries, they typically list the prepositional pronoun forms in the entry for the preposition...so, for example, "leat" would be under "le."

Redwolf

Post November 04 2010, 15:39 PM
Daifne
Getting Addicted
 
Posts: 51
Redwolf wrote:No prob!

Should you ever need to look them up, the entire set of prepositional pronouns can usually be found in the "grammar" section of any English/Irish-Irish/English dictionary (which is usually in the center, but sometimes at the end). In the bigger dictionaries, they typically list the prepositional pronoun forms in the entry for the preposition...so, for example, "leat" would be under "le."

Redwolf


Ok! I'll check it out! :)
I'm not Irish; I learn the language just for fun

Post November 04 2010, 19:31 PM
Breandán
Giostaire
 
Posts: 4409
Here's a link that might be helpful:

http://www.dfwgaelicleague.com/files/GlanceCard.pdf

Post November 05 2010, 6:31 AM
Daifne
Getting Addicted
 
Posts: 51
Breandán wrote:Here's a link that might be helpful:

http://www.dfwgaelicleague.com/files/GlanceCard.pdf


Wow yes indeed that's very helpful! Thanks!
I'm not Irish; I learn the language just for fun



Who is online

Registered users: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot], Google Adsense [Bot], Majestic-12 [Bot], Yahoo [Bot]