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Some phrases in the Donegal dialect, please?

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Post October 29 2010, 17:50 PM
ODomhnaill
New Arrival
 
Posts: 7
:) Dia dhuit! I have a few questions. PRONUNCIATION help is greatly appreciated and, if possible, I would like to know the versions of the words/phrases that would be used in county Donegal.

1.) How would you just say "Whatever." in Irish? ("Whatever." being the entire sentance.)
2.) Which version of the word "horse" would be used in Donegal?
3.) How would you say "Death does not end love."?
4.) "My Love, Forever" / "My forever love" ?

And I just want to say ahead of time: Thank you so much for any help! :D

 
Post October 29 2010, 19:14 PM
CaoimhínSF
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 5554
Dia dhuit! I have a few questions. PRONUNCIATION help is greatly appreciated and, if possible, I would like to know the versions of the words/phrases that would be used in county Donegal.

1.) How would you just say "Whatever." in Irish? ("Whatever." being the entire sentance.)
2.) Which version of the word "horse" would be used in Donegal?
3.) How would you say "Death does not end love."?
4.) "My Love, Forever" / "My forever love" ?


I'm not aware of any Donegal-specific variants for these particular phrases/words, and I think you could use "standard" ones:

There is no real one-word equivalent of "whatever" which can stand on its own in that sense in Irish. The best I can think of is the phrase pé scéal é, a very common saying serving more or less the same purpose, and literally meaning "whatever the story may be". If you mean it in the bored or even sarcastic sense of "whatever, I don't care", then you could also use is cuma ("it doesn't matter").

horse = capall [an older term is each]

Ní chuireann an Bás deireadh leis an nGrá
Death does not put an end to love.

A Ghrá, go deo [said when addressing the person directly]
My Love, forever [presumably this one would be answering a question, as in "Yes, my eternal love, (it will be) forever"]
Mo Ghrá, go deo [said when discussing the person, but not talking to him/her]
My Love forever [as in "He'll be my eternal love forever"]

A shíorghrá [said when addressing the person directly]
Mo shíorghrá [said when discussing the person, but not talking to him/her]
My forever/eternal love

You can use this link to get to a site where you can type in Irish words or phrases and hear them pronounced, but note that it seems to work better word by word or in small chunks, and it happens to favor the Ulster dialect (i.e. Donegal) in any case:
http://www.abair.tcd.ie/?page=synthesis&lang=eng

Corrections made as noted below.
Last edited by CaoimhínSF on October 29 2010, 20:40 PM, edited 1 time in total.
I'm still a learner, so be sure to get input from others, especially for tattoos.

Post October 29 2010, 20:19 PM
Gumbi
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 5528
Ní chuireann an Bás deireadh leis an nGrá
I believe.

Would it not be "Is cuma liom" for "I don't care"? I would translate "Is cuma" as "It doesn't matter".
Await confirmation always, please.

Post October 29 2010, 20:43 PM
CaoimhínSF
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 5554
Ní chuireann an Bás deireadh leis an nGrá
I believe.

Would it not be "Is cuma liom" for "I don't care"? I would translate "Is cuma" as "It doesn't matter".


Yes in both cases. I tried to put the "I" in "I don't care" in brackets, to indicate that it wasn't really there and that it was really an abstract "whatever" type of phrase, but the system turns even a capital "I" in brackets into italics, so I gave up on that and left the "I" there. "It doesn't matter" is a better choice, though.
I'm still a learner, so be sure to get input from others, especially for tattoos.

Post October 29 2010, 22:01 PM
Bodhránbob
Giostaire
 
Posts: 3155
There are some variants within Donegal itself (this from a Munsterite)
In NW Donegal capall means mare

I think DT had a post on it but I cant find it
Image
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Nuair a shuíonn an coileach péacoige ar a thóin, níl ann ach turcaí
Chief Buffalo Breath
===========================


Wisdom is never on the menu, you have to own the restaurant.

Post October 29 2010, 23:45 PM
fiairefeadha
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 6120
Cibé would be used more so than (munsterism)

Post October 30 2010, 10:38 AM
Teifeach
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 7359
yeah Possibly Cibé /Cibé rud

Post October 30 2010, 13:05 PM
miseféin
Gaeilgeoir
 
Posts: 225
Gumbi wrote:Ní chuireann an Bás deireadh leis an nGrá
I believe.


According to my teacher, the tendency in Donegal is to use séimhiú rather than urú after a preposition + an, which would make this:

Ní chuireann an Bás deireadh leis an Gh

Has anybody else heard of this?
Is foghlaimeoir mé

Post October 30 2010, 13:37 PM
Craig11
Scéalaí Mór
 
Posts: 1754
Yes your on the money miseféin
Good spot
Is foghlaimeoir mé
Wait for 3 confirmations

Post October 30 2010, 16:37 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
miseféin wrote:
Gumbi wrote:Ní chuireann an Bás deireadh leis an nGrá
I believe.


According to my teacher, the tendency in Donegal is to use séimhiú rather than urú after a preposition + an, which would make this:

Ní chuireann an Bás deireadh leis an Gh

Has anybody else heard of this?


Yes, that's true.

The point someone made about "capall" being "mare" in parts of Donegal is true as well, but I'm not sure what they use for "horse" in general. My guess is "each," but that's just a guess.

Redwolf


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