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SG: Shaelin

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Post August 11 2010, 18:06 PM
trzapfe
New Arrival
 
Posts: 2
I would like to have my daughters name translated from English into Scottish Gaelic. I hope someone can help me. Her name in english is Shaelin. Thank you very much!! Tami

 
Post August 11 2010, 21:40 PM
Redwolf
Ard-Banríon na Ráiméise
 
Posts: 57599
trzapfe wrote:I would like to have my daughters name translated from English into Scottish Gaelic. I hope someone can help me. Her name in english is Shaelin. Thank you very much!! Tami


Names only have Irish forms if they're Irish to begin with, names with longstanding association with Ireland, or, in some cases, Biblical or saints names. "Shaelin" doesn't fall into any of those categories, and thus doesn't have an Irish form. I suspect the same will be true of Scottish Gaelic.

I'm editing your header to read "SG: Shaelin." Most people here don't have any Scottish Gaelic (it's a different language from Irish), so that will increase its chances of being seen.

Redwolf

Post August 12 2010, 0:53 AM
CaoimhínSF
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 5554
I checked some online sites, and I agree with Redwolf that there is no Irish or Scottish Gaelic version of the name. It is probably an American creation from the name Shea (or Shay, as it has sometimes been written in America since it became a first name), perhaps created by analogy to the word colleen (cailín in Irish), on the assumption that -leen (or -lin) can be added to any male name to make a female version of it.

What makes that seem likely is that some of the sites say that the name "comes from" the Irish [Ó] Séaghdha, supposedly meaning "admirable", which is an older spelling of the name [O']Shea (nowadays usually spelled Ó Sé in Irish). MacLysaght’s Surnames of Ireland says that séaghdha meant "hawklike", with a "secondary meaning" of "stately", which may be where some have gotten the concept of it meaning "admirable". In modern Irish, sea [no accent on the "e"] can mean "strength", "vigor", or "esteem", so it may be related to the older word séaghdha.
I'm still a learner, so be sure to get input from others, especially for tattoos.

Post August 13 2010, 16:59 PM
trzapfe
New Arrival
 
Posts: 2
Thank you so much Redwolf and Kevin, I appreciate the help. Would either of you know how the last name McKenzie would be spelled in SG?
It's my mother's maiden name and I'm curious. Anyone else who could help I would appreciate it. Thanks!

Post August 13 2010, 21:13 PM
CaoimhínSF
Craiceáilte
 
Posts: 5554
Would either of you know how the last name McKenzie would be spelled in SG?


MacCoinnich for a man
NicCoinnich for a woman (if it's the name she was born with)

The Irish normally put a space between the Mac or Nic and the rest of the name. The Scots often don't. That Scottish custom may be how the anglicized versions mostly ended up without the space (just a theory of mine).
I'm still a learner, so be sure to get input from others, especially for tattoos.



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